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Evidence-Based Approaches to Social Skills Training with Children and Adolescents

  • Sharon L. Foster
  • Julie R. Bussman
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Keywords

Social Skill Parent Training Fast Track Social Skill Training Friendship Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon L. Foster
  • Julie R. Bussman

There are no affiliations available

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