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Evidence-Based Treatment for Children with Serious Emotional Disturbance

  • Camille J. Randall
  • Eric M. Vernberg
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Keywords

Disruptive Behavior Juvenile Justice Emotional Disturbance Intensive Case Management Good Behavior Game 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Camille J. Randall
    • 1
  • Eric M. Vernberg
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Kansas

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