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Empirically Supported Treatments and Evidence-Based Practice for Children and Adolescents

  • Michael C. Roberts
  • Rochelle L. James
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Keywords

Task Force American Psychological Association Adolescent Mental Health Task Force Report Pediatric Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael C. Roberts
    • 1
  • Rochelle L. James
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Kansas, Clinical Child Psychology Program

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