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Structure-Function Relationship Study of Parathyroid Hormone (1–11) Analogues Containing D-AA

  • A. Caporale
  • N. Fiori
  • E. Schievano
  • A. Wittelsberger
  • S. Mammi
  • M. Chorev
  • E. Peggion
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (volume 611)

Introduction

In mammals, parathyroid hormone (PTH) [1], an 84 amino acid hormone, plays a vital role in regulating the concentrations of ionized calcium and phosphate in the blood and extracellular fluids. It has been shown that the first 34 amino acid fragment of PTH is sufficient to bind to and activate the PTH type I receptor (PTH1R), a heptahelical transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor. The molecular mechanisms by which PTH(1–34) binds to and activates the PTH1R have been extensively investigated [2]. The study of miniaturized PTH agonist and antagonist analogues has been the subject of extensive research [3], for the development of safer and non-parenteral bone anabolic drugs. Recent investigations focusing on the interaction of N-terminal fragments of PTH with PTH1R showed that certain modifications can increase signalling potency in peptides as short as 11 amino acids. To understand the role of the side-chains of all amino acid residues of the most active analogue of...

Keywords

Parathyroid Hormone Secondary Chemical Guanidine Group Amino Acid Fragment Signalling Potency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Caporale
    • 1
  • N. Fiori
    • 1
  • E. Schievano
    • 1
  • A. Wittelsberger
    • 2
  • S. Mammi
    • 1
  • M. Chorev
    • 3
  • E. Peggion
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Chemical SciencesUniv. of Padova, Institute of Biomolecular ChemistryPadovaItaly
  2. 2.Dept. of PhysiologyTufts Univ. School of MedicineBostonUSA
  3. 3.Lab. For Translational ResearchHarvard Medical School, One Kendall SquareCambridgeUSA

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