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Chemical modifications of short antimicrobial peptides from insects and vertebrates to fight multi-drug resistant bacteria

  • Daniel Knappe
  • Christin Stegemann
  • Ariane Nimptsch
  • Alexander Jr Kolobov
  • Ekaterina Korableva
  • Olga Shamova
  • Vladimir N. Kokryakov
  • Ralf Hoffmann
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (volume 611)

Introduction

The presence of antimicrobial substances in secretions, blood and leukocytes has been known since the end of the 19th century. Later different classes of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with specific activities against bacteria, fungi and viruses were isolated from vertebrates as well as from invertebrates. These gene-encoded peptides differ in length from about 10 to more than 100 amino acid residues showing a great variety in structure and antimicrobial modes of action, targeting either the cell membrane or intracellular targets.

The emergence of bacterial and fungal pathogens resistant to small molecule antimicrobial drugs demands the development of new antibiotics with novel modes of action. These new antibacterial molecules are urgently needed to treat patients in hospitals and nursing homes infected by resistant or multidrug resistant pathogens that become increasingly live threatening for patients with an already weakened immune system. Many native antimicrobial...

Keywords

Minimal Inhibitory Concentration Antimicrobial Peptide Minimal Inhibitory Concentration Micrococcus Luteus Agar Diffusion Assay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Financial support by the European Fond for Regional Structure Development (EFRE, European Union and the Free State Saxonia) is gratefully acknowledged. We thank Laszlo Otvos Jr. for helpful discussions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Knappe
    • 1
  • Christin Stegemann
    • 1
  • Ariane Nimptsch
    • 1
  • Alexander Jr Kolobov
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ekaterina Korableva
    • 2
    • 3
  • Olga Shamova
    • 2
  • Vladimir N. Kokryakov
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ralf Hoffmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Bioanalytical Chemistry, Center for Biotechnology and BiomedicineFaculty of Chemistry and Mineralogy, Leipzig UniversityLeipzigGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesSaint-Petersburg
  3. 3.Saint-Petersburg State UniversitySaint-PetersburgRussia

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