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Interactions of peptides with single-walled carbon nanotubes

  • Zhengding Su
  • Ken Mui
  • Elisabeth Daub
  • Tong Leung
  • John Honek
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (volume 611)

Introduction

Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have promising applications in the fields of biotechnology and medicine due to their unique electrical, metallic and structural characteristics1, 2. Recently the design and utilization of polypeptides specifically binding to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been the focus of much attention due to their functionality in biological systems3. Therefore, mechanism(s) of interaction between biomolecules and SWNTs is a critical focus of investigation because the extent of nanotube functionality and reactivity in biological systems remains relatively unknown and this knowledge will be important in understanding their environmental and biological activity as well as their potential for application to nanostructure fabrication.

Results and Discussion

As an initial step, three classes of phage libraries defined by length and constrained conformation were screened against SWNTs (Figure 1a). In these constructed peptide libraries, peptides (12-mers,...

Keywords

Binding Affinity High Occupied Molecular Orbital Lower Unoccupied Molecular Orbital High Occupied Molecular Orbital Lower Unoccupied Molecular Orbital 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

We thank NSERC Nano Innovation Platform for financial support of this research.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhengding Su
    • 1
  • Ken Mui
    • 1
  • Elisabeth Daub
    • 1
  • Tong Leung
    • 1
  • John Honek
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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