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EDA Tutorial

  • Dirk Jansen
Chapter

Abstract

This tutorial will demonstrate in an easily understood example what is known as top down design. The example selected, a ‘rolling dice’, was taken from student education in the university of the author. It has been used for many years in the VHDL basics course [26.3] and for first prototype runs in new CMOS technologies and for this reason it exists in several different implementations. It may be traced back to a first implementation [26.1], awarded as the second best student design on the international EUROPRACTICE conference in 1994 in Dresden [26.6]. It contains several different techniques for realizing a Finite State Machine, tightly coupled and locking with each other, and is far from trivial. The design with about 230 gates may be regarded as small today, but a complete reprint of the schematics generated from the code or the VHDL code itself is not possible in the context of this book, see [26.4] for more details. The design is demonstrated here in all its steps until it reaches the stage of being a product which is used by the author, e.g., as advertising tag for the university, as a visiting card, or similar purposes.

Keywords

Finite State Machine State Diagram CMOS Technology Direction Output Input Word 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. [26.1]
    Joachim Schweiker: ‘Entwicklung eines Einchip Würfels in ES _2 Standardzellentechnologie’, Studienarbeit at the Fachhochschule Offenburg, SS 93Google Scholar
  2. [26.2]
    Roland Tornar, Stefan Schleer, Wolfgang Harter: ‘Würfel in Hybridtechik, Aufbau des ausrollenden Würfels als Hybridschaltung auf einem Keramiksubstrat’. Studienarbeit at the Fachhochschule Offenburg, SS 97Google Scholar
  3. [26.3]
    Wolfgang Vollmer, Dirk Jansen: Lecture notes VHDL Course, Fachhochschule Offenburg, WS 98/99Google Scholar
  4. [26.4]
    Homepage of the ASIC Design Center, University of Applied Sciences, FH-Offenburg: http://www.asic.fh-offenburg.de
  5. [26.5]
    Homepage of europractice: http://www.europractice.com/
  6. [26.6]
    Fifth EUROCHIP WORKSHOP ON VLSI TRAINING, 17.–19. October 2000, Dresden, GermanyGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dirk Jansen

There are no affiliations available

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