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Lead compounds include over forty naturally occurring minerals from which five lead oxides can be derived. The lead oxides, as well as some lead silicates, are used as raw materials in lead-containing glasses and crystalline electronic ceramics. The presence of lead in glass increases the refractive index, decreases the viscosity, increases the electrical resistivity, and increases the X-ray absorption capability of the glass. The lead in electronic ceramics increases the Curie temperature and modifies various electrical and optical properties. The refinement of metallic lead from minerals and recycled goods such as lead acid batteries and cathode ray tubes is a multistep process, supplemented by oxidation steps to produce lead oxides. Lead compounds are known to be toxic and are therefore highly regulated.

Keywords

Lead Compound Lead Oxide Leaded Glass Metallic Lead Lead Silicate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie M. Schoenung
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials ScienceUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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