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Clays are ubiquitous constituents of the Earth’s crust that serve as raw materials for traditional ceramics. Mineralogically, clays are phyllosilicates or layered aluminosilicates. Bonding is strong within layers, but weak between layers, allowing clays to break into micrometer-sized particles. When mixed with water, clays develop plasticity and can be shaped easily and reproducibly. When heated, clays undergo a series of reactions that ultimately produce crystalline mullite and a silica-rich amorphous phase. Beyond the structure and properties of clays, the science that developed to understand traditional ceramics continues to serve as the framework for the study of advanced ceramics.

Keywords

Clay Mineral Clay Deposit Brick Clay Slip Casting Octahedral Sheet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • William G. Fahrenholtz
    • 1
  1. 1.Materials Science and Engineering DepartmentMissouri University of Science and TechnologyRollaUSA

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