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Quality management, regulation, and accreditation

  • Jerry A. Cohen
  • Sorin J. Brull
  • Walter G. Maurer

Abstract

A brief review of the nomenclature may be helpful to start: accreditation is the act of granting credit or recognition, especially with respect to an institution that maintains suitable standards; certification (or credentialing or qualification) is a designation earned by a person that indicates that the individual has a specific knowledge, set of skills, or abilities in the view of a certifying body; privileging is a special advantage, qualification, permission, right, or benefit that is granted to an individual by an institution, usually based on the individual’s specific knowledge or set of skills (credentials). Regulation of medical practice (where regulation is defined as “a rule created by an administrative agency or body that interprets the statute(s) defining an agency’s purpose and powers, or the circumstances of applying the statute”) may take various forms. The objective of regulation in medical practice is to control cost and improve services rendered, by laying down ground rules for the structures, processes, and acceptable outcomes of care while at the same time establishing a fair and consistent, legally defensible basis for credentialing and privileging.

Keywords

Quality Management Joint Commission Quality Improvement Program Continuous Quality Improvement Root Cause Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerry A. Cohen
    • 1
  • Sorin J. Brull
    • 2
  • Walter G. Maurer
    • 3
  1. 1.University of FloridaCollege of MedicineGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Mayo Clinic College of MedicineJacksonvilleUSA
  3. 3.Department of AnesthesiologyCleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA

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