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Research on Teaching Health and Physical Education

  • John R. Todorovich
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 21)

Research in health and physical education (HPE) is neither new nor unidimensional. Rather, researchers engaging in HPE research have produced numerous studies evolving in complexity and clarity over a relatively short 35 years of concerted and focused research. Indeed, comprehensive reviews of early research were possible because of few research lines and a short research history (e.g., Nixon & Locke, 1973). Today, however research in health and physical education is a broad and multi-faceted endeavor.

Due to the complex nature of HPE research, this chapter was written with the more narrow focus of research on teaching health and physical education (RT-HPE). This focus involves “research on what teachers and students do and how this affects and relates to learning and social dynamics of the class” (Silverman, 1991, p. 352). This does not include research on teacher education, research on curriculum or behavioral theory, or research on curricular interventions. A review combining two or more of these areas is beyond the scope of this chapter and can be found elsewhere.

Keywords

Preservice Teacher Physical Education Prospective Teacher Pedagogical Content Knowledge Teacher Education Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Todorovich
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise ScienceUniversity of West FloridaPensacola

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