Advertisement

Teaching Indigenous Populations

  • Rodney A. Clifton
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 21)

Cultural and ethnic differences play a major role, both positive and negative, in modern societies (Harrison & Huntington, 2000), not least in the education of ethnic minorities, particularly in the education of indigenous students (Glazer, 2000). In modern societies, the education of indigenous students is made difficult, simply and importantly, by culturally specific and often different conceptions of the legitimacy of both schools and teachers (see, e.g., Champagne & Abu-Saad, 2006; Jordan, 1995; Kleinfeld, 1995). This chapter argues that to create more effective education for indigenous students three things are required. First, authority-based schools that are sensitive to the culture of students, parents, and community elders are necessary. Second, indigenous people need to understand, and accept, the legitimate function that schools serve in modern societies. Finally, it is necessary to have truly empathetic teachers who are also experts in the subjects they teach. These conditions are necessary for all successful teaching and learning, but they are especially crucial when nonindigenous teachers are teaching indigenous students; potentially, if these conditions are met, they provide indigenous students with the opportunity of participating in both their traditional community and the modern society where they live.

Keywords

Young People Indigenous People Modern Society Indigenous Population Traditional Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abu-Saad, I., & Champagne, D. (Eds.). (2006). Indigenous education and empowerment: International perspectives. Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bidwell, C. E. (2001). Analyzing schools as organizations: Long-term permanence and short-term change. Sociology of Education, Extra Issue, 100–114.Google Scholar
  3. Bredemeier, M. E., & Bredemeier, H. C. (1978). Social forces in education. Sherman Oaks, CA: Alfred Publishing.Google Scholar
  4. Bryk, A. S., & Schneider, B. (2002). Trust in schools: A core resource for improvement. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.Google Scholar
  5. Champagne, D., & Abu-Saad, I. (2006). Introduction: Seeking common ground through education. In I. Abu-Saad & D. Champagne (Eds.), Indigenous education and empowerment: International perspectives (pp. 1–11). Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
  6. Clifton, R. A. (1972). The social adjustment of native students in a northern hostel. Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology, 9, 163–166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Clifton, R. A. (1994). Race and ethnicity in education. In T. Husen & T. N. Postlethwaite (Eds.), The international encyclopedia of education (Vol. 8, pp. 4891–4896). New York: Elsivier Science.Google Scholar
  8. Clifton, R. A., & Roberts, L. W. (1993). Authority in classrooms. Scarborough, ON: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  9. Crossette, B. (2000). Culture, gender, and human rights. In L. E. Harrison & S. P. Huntington (Eds.), Culture matters: How values shape human progress (pp. 178–188). New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  10. Edgerton, R. B. (2000). Traditional beliefs and practices — Are some better than others? In L. E. Harrison & S. P. Huntington (Eds.), Culture matters: How values shape human progress (pp. 126–140). New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  11. Glazer, N. (2000). Disaggregating culture. In L. E. Harrison & S. P. Huntington (Eds.), Culture matters: How values shape human progress (pp. 219–230). New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  12. Goodlad, J. I. (1984). A place called school: Prospects for the future. New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  13. Harrison, L. E., & Huntington, S. P. (Eds.). (2000). Culture matters: How values shape human progress. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  14. Hermes, M. (2005). “Ma'iingan” is just a misspelling of the word “wolf ”: A case for teaching culture through language. Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 36, 43–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Hirsch, E. D., Jr. (1988). Cultural literacy: What every American needs to know. New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  16. Htun, M. (2000). Culture, institutions, and gender inequality in Latin America. In L. E. Harrison & S. P. Huntington (Eds.), Culture matters: How values shape human progress (pp. 189–199). New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  17. Jessor, R., Colby, A., & Shweder, R. A. (Eds.). (1996). Ethnography and human development: Context and meaning in social inquiry. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  18. Jordan, D. F. (1995). Education and the reclaiming of identity: Rights and claims of Canadian Indians, Norwegian Sami, and Australian Aborigines. In L. W. Roberts & R. A. Clifton (Eds.), Crosscurrents: Contemporary Canadian educational issues (pp. 46–67). Toronto, ON: Nelson Canada.Google Scholar
  19. Juan, S. (1994). Education of indigenous peoples, anthropological study of. In T. Husen & T. N. Postlethwaite (Eds.), The international encyclopedia of education (Vol. 3, pp. 1750–1756). New York: Elsevier Science.Google Scholar
  20. Kaomea, J. (2005). Indigenous studies in elementary curriculum: A cautionary Hawaiian example. Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 36, 24–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Kleinfeld, J. (1995). Effective teachers of Eskimo and Indian students. In L. W. Roberts & R. A. Clifton (Eds.), Crosscurrents: Contemporary Canadian educational issues (pp. 68–96). Toronto, ON: Nelson Canada.Google Scholar
  22. LaFrance, B. (1994). Empowering ourselves: Making education and schooling one. Peabody Journal of Education, 69, 19–25.Google Scholar
  23. McCarty, T., Borgoiakova, T., Gilmore, P., Lomawaima, K. T., & Romero, M. E. (2005). Indigenous episte-mologies and education — Self-determination. Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 36, 1–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Noddings, N. (1992). The challenge to care in schools: An alternative approach to education. New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  25. Patterson, O. (2000). Taking culture seriously: A framework and an Afro-American illustration. In L. E. Harrison & S. P. Huntington (Eds.), Culture matters: How values shape human progress (pp. 202– 218). New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  26. Sachs, J. (2000). Notes on the new sociology of economic development. In L. E. Harrison & S. P. Huntington (Eds.), Culture matters: How values shape human progress (pp. 29–43). New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  27. Snipp, C. M. (1992). Sociological perspectives on American Indians. Annual Review of Sociology, 18, 351–371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Stairs, A. (1994). The cultural negotiation of indigenous education: Between microethnography and model-building. Peabody Journal of Education, 69, 154–171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Turnbull, C. M. (1961). The forest people. New York: Simon and Schuster.Google Scholar
  30. Waller, W. (1965). The sociology of teaching. New York: John Wiley. (Original work published 1932)Google Scholar
  31. Weber, M. (1947). The theory of social and economic organizations (A. R. Henderson & T. Parsons, Trans.). New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  32. White, M. I. (1984). Japanese education: How do they do it? The Public Interest, 76, 87–101.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rodney A. Clifton
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Education, St. John's CollegeUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada

Personalised recommendations