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Teaching for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)

  • Hugh Guthrie
  • Roger Harris
  • Michele Simons
  • Tom Karmel
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 21)
This chapter explores notions of teaching in technical and vocational education and training (TVET) settings. To do this we will
  • consider the essential differences between vocational and academic approaches to education

  • discuss the diverse approaches to TVET teaching and the directions in which conceptions of it are moving

  • consider what the role of being a teacher involves and how teachers are trained and developed to enhance the quality of their practice and vocational competence, and

  • finally, present some conclusions.

The authors' experience is largely in Australia and Europe, and so these will be the focus, and from where examples will be predominantly drawn. These are mature, yet diverse, TVET systems.

TVET systems are increasingly becoming recognised by governments as very important to economic development through their focus on skills for the labour market. They are also seen as instruments of social policy, for example to assist those in particular social groups, such as those in poverty, or who lack marketable skills (Basu, 1997).

Keywords

Vocational Education Mobile Learning Workplace Learning Vocational Learner Vocational Teacher 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugh Guthrie
    • 1
  • Roger Harris
    • 2
  • Michele Simons
    • 2
  • Tom Karmel
    • 1
  1. 1.National Centre for Vocational Education ResearchAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.Professional Community Identity and Social Justice, School of EducationUniversity of South AustraliaMawson, Lakes CampusAustralia, Margaret

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