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Essential Information for Disaster Management and Trauma Specialists Working with American Indians

  • Jeannette L. Johnson
  • Julie Baldwin
  • Rodney C. Haring
  • Shelly A. Wiechelt
  • Susan Roth
  • Jan Gryczynski
  • Henry Lozano
Part of the International and Cultural Psychology Series book series (ICUP)

Keywords

Disaster Management Alaska Native Indian Health Service American Indian Community American Indian Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeannette L. Johnson
  • Julie Baldwin
  • Rodney C. Haring
  • Shelly A. Wiechelt
  • Susan Roth
  • Jan Gryczynski
  • Henry Lozano

There are no affiliations available

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