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Introduction and Overview

  • Randy Stringer
  • Leslie Lipper
  • Takumi Sakuyama
  • David Zilberman
Part of the Natural Resource Management and Policy book series (NRMP, volume 31)

There is growing concern about natural resource degradation, sustainable development, and poverty reduction. In recent years, payments for environmental services (PES) programs have emerged as major components of sustainable development policies. These programs are in place in several developing countries. However, the implications of PES programs for the rural poor, the optimal design of programs to contribute to economic development, and how these initiatives integrate into international treaties to address global warming and biodiversity loss, are still not clear. This book attempts to fill this gap.

To date, the vast majority of theoretical, methodological, and empirical PES research in developing countries has focused on forests or water resource systems (FAO, 2007; Landell-Mills & Porras, 2002). This book turns attention toward the role of environmental services in agricultural landscapes because the poor in developing countries are concentrated in rural areas and earn their...

Keywords

Ecosystem Service Clean Development Mechanism Poverty Reduction Distributional Objective Conservation Cost 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. FAO (2007) The state of food and agriculture: Paying farmers for environmental services. Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, Rome, Italy.Google Scholar
  2. Landell-Mills N, Porras IT (2002) Markets for forest environmental services: Silver bullet or fools’ gold? Markets for forest environmental services and the poor, emerging issues. International Institute for Environmental Development, London, UK.Google Scholar
  3. World Bank (2003) World development report 2003: Sustainable development in a dynamic world. World Bank, Washington, DC.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© FAO 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Randy Stringer
    • Leslie Lipper
      • Takumi Sakuyama
        • David Zilberman

          There are no affiliations available

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