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Multinational Perspectives on End-of-Life Issues in the Intensive Care Unit

Communication skills are paramount to the successful and humane practice of critical care medicine. By definition, patients admitted to the critical care unit have a substantial likelihood of dying, therefore open and honest communication with the patient and significant others must begin from the earliest moments of intensive care. The Study to Understand Prognoses and Preferences for Outcomes and Risks of Treatments (SUPPORT) was conducted in five large American teaching hospitals.1 This study demonstrated that physicians, patients, and families often do not communicate well concerning end-of-life issues. Further, the active intervention of a trained intermediary to enhance communication did little to improve the end-of-life experience, and many patients who would have otherwise wished to forgo resuscitation spent time comatose or mechanically ventilated prior to death.

Keywords

Intensive Care Unit Palliative Care Gross Domestic Product Intensive Care Unit Admission Life Support 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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