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Obtaining Evidence for the International Criminal Court Using Data and Quantitative Analysis

  • Herbert F. Spirer
  • William Seltzer

The judicial systems of many countries recognize the value of scientific evidence, including statistical analysis of data in many civil and criminal cases. Quantitative analyses of human rights violations can also have evidentiary value comparable to DNA testing, forensics, and chemical analysis. In this chapter, we describe and discuss evidentiary issues that arise in International Criminal Tribunals that try alleged perpetrators for serious human rights crimes. Our goal is to promote the effective use of statistical and demographic data and methods in these settings. Toward this end, we spell out their potential advantages in this particular legal environment and discuss problems in their use with the hope of stimulating open discussion among various actors.

Keywords

Mass Grave International Criminal Court International Criminal Rome Statute Trial Chamber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Herbert F. Spirer
  • William Seltzer

There are no affiliations available

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