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HIV/AIDS in South and Southeast Asia: An Overview

  • David D. Celentano
  • Chris Beyrer
  • Wendy W. Davis

Asia is home to nearly half of the planet’s population, and is dominated by two countries with over one billion citizens each—China and India. The region is comprised of a large number of ethnically diverse peoples, ranging from the Hmong tribemen of Vietnam, Laos, and Southern China to the more than 60 distinct ethnic groups in Burma alone, including the vast Indian and Chinese diasporas which have distributed peoples from these countries across Asia, from Thailand to Oceana. Culturally, the countries and peoples of Asia are similarly diverse, ranging from widely varying religions (Buddhist, Taoist, Hindu, Christian, Muslim, among dozens of others), political structures (from military dictatorships, to constitutional monarchies, four of the world’s five remaining communist states, and vibrant democracies), and vast differences in a large variety of beliefs, attitudes and values regarding the structures of society, the family, and the individual. Despite the complexity of considering...

Keywords

Harm Reduction Methadone Maintenance Treatment Compulsory License Syringe Exchange Program Doha Declaration 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • David D. Celentano
    • 1
  • Chris Beyrer
    • 1
  • Wendy W. Davis
    • 1
  1. 1.Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA

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