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Treatment Process

  • Michael Duffy
Chapter

Introduction

This chapter provides an overview of several important parameters of providing quality psychological treatment to residents in long-term care settings. Clinical geropsychologists made early important strides in developing psychological assessment procedures for residents in long-term care setting (see Chap. 3) and also now have focused increasing attention on providing treatment services. Newly available resource materials will be cited throughout this chapter.

Work in nursing homes and assisted-living communities, is distinctly different from general outpatient office psychotherapy and requires a greater flexibility and tolerance for ambiguity in the therapist. As in hospital and residential settings, older adults do not view themselves as mental health patients, and generally belong to a cohort that has little cultural appreciation for the concept of mental health. Persons who weathered the Great Depression and the Second World War often developed a survival mentality...

Keywords

Personality Disorder Nursing Home Resident Therapeutic Relationship Medicare Reimbursement Nurse Aide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Duffy

There are no affiliations available

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