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In the past two decades, the study of craft production has emerged as a major focus of archaeological research, integrating interests in technology, material culture, daily activities, ecology, economic organization, political economy, and exchange. There have been advances on all fronts of the inquiry: definition of the concepts and questions addressed, development of analytic techniques, statement of epistemology and theory, and presentation of a wealth of data from substantive case studies (compare Tringham, 1996:234; e.g., Bey and Pool, 1992; Brumfiel and Earle, 1987b; Clark and Parry, 1990; Costin, 1991; Costin and Wright, 1998; Dobres and Hoffman, 1994; Mills and Crown, 1995; Peregrine, 1991b; Wailes, 1996).

Keywords

Social Identity Archaeological Record Labor Investment Craft Production Sociopolitical Context 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cathy Lynne Costin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyCalifornia State UniversityNorthridgeUSA

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