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Classical Archaeology and Anthropological Archaeology in North America: A Meeting of Minds at the Millennium?

  • Jack L. Davis

As the only Mediterranean archaeologist to contribute to this volume, I was given a particularly difficult assignment: to discuss the state of classical archaeology in the United States at the turn of the millennium.1 I was initially perplexed by the invitation. Why had other authors been asked to discuss current research as it pertains to a specific problem in anthropological archaeology, while it was intended that I summarize the state of affairs in an entire subdiscipline of archaeology? Was it perhaps because the editors of this book believed (correctly?) that their colleagues would not be familiar with studies in Mediterranean archaeology? Did they feel that classical archaeology was a field distinct from anthropological archaeology in its theory, methods, and problem orientation? Were they simply extending a friendly hand across a mysterious gulf in the hope that something useful might be returned in kind?

Keywords

American School World Archaeology Archaeological Theory Field Archaeology Surface Survey 
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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack L. Davis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ClassicsUniversity of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA

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