Advertisement

Routing Conflict: Organized Violence and Clientelism in Rio de Janeiro

  • Enrique Desmond Arias

Studying politics in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas (shantytowns) is an extremely challenging enterprise in light of the immense violence facing these communities. During my first research trip to Rio in 1996 few wanted to help me, an inexperienced and young researcher, gain access to any favela. After nearly a month of efforts I visited the favela of Rocinha under the auspices of an internship program run by the Pontifica Universidade Católica (PUC), an elite private college. On one of my early visits I attended an end-of-the-semester party at PUC’s center in the community where I met Roberto, a young politician campaigning for city council. When I lamented my difficulties gaining access to favelas he told me that “you just have to know the right people” and invited me along to visit several that evening. I accepted and in minutes we had left on a journey that would take us to three favelas.

Keywords

Poor Community Drug Trafficking Local Leader Electoral Cycle Drug Trafficker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alvito, M. (2001). As cores de acarí: Uma favela carioca. Rio de Janeiro: Editora FGV.Google Scholar
  2. Archer, R. (1995). Party strength and weakness in Colombia’s besieged democracy. In S. Mainwaring & T. Scully (Eds.), Building democratic institutions: Party systems in Latin America. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Arias, E. D. (2004). Faith in our neighbors: Networks and social order in three Brazilian favelas. Latin American Politics and Society 6 (Spring), 1–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Auyero, J. (2000). Poor people’s politics: Peronist survival networks and the legacy of Evita. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Barcellos, C. (2003). Abusado: O dono de morro Dona Marta. Rio de Janeiro: Editora Record.Google Scholar
  6. Bourdieu, P. (1998). Practical reason: On the theory of action. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Burgos, M. B. (1998). Dos parques proletários ao Favela-Bairro: as políticas públicas nas favelas do Rio de Janeiro. In A. Zaluar, & M. Alvito (Eds.), Um século de Favela. Rio de Janeiro: Editora FGV.Google Scholar
  8. Chalmers, D. (1977). Parties and society in Latin America. In S. Schmidt, L. Guasti, C. Landé, & J. Scott (Eds.), Friends, followers, and factions: A reader in political clientelism. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  9. Diniz, E. (1982). Voto e a máquina política: Patronagem e clientelismo no Rio de Janeiro. São Paulo: Editora Paz e Terra.Google Scholar
  10. Dowdney, L. (2003). Children of the drug trade: A case study of children in organised armed violence in Rio de Janeiro. Rio de Janeiro: 7Letras.Google Scholar
  11. Gay, R. (1990). Popular incorporation and the prospects for democracy: Some implications of the Brazilian Case. Theory and Society 19, 447–463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Gay, R. (1994). Popular organization and democracy in Rio de Janeiro: A tale of two Favelas. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Gay, R. (1998). Rethinking clientelism: Demands, discourses, and practices in contemporary Brazil. European Review of Latin American and Caribbean Studies 65, 7–24.Google Scholar
  14. Gay, R. (1999). The broker and the thief: A parable (Reflections on popular politics in Brazil). Luso-Brazilian Review 1, 36.Google Scholar
  15. Gay, R. (2005). Lucia: Testimonies of a Brazilian drug traffickers woman. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Goldstein, D. (2003). Laughter out of place: Race class, violence in a Rio shantytown. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  17. Graham, R. (1990). Patronage and politics in nineteenth century Brazil. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Gunst, L. (1998). Born fi’ dead: A journey through the Jamaican posse underworld. New York: Henry Holt and Company.Google Scholar
  19. Hagopian, F. (1992). The compromised consolidation: Political class in the Brazilian transition. In S. Mainwaring, G. O’Donnell, & J. S. Valenzuela, Issues in democratic consolidation: The new South American democracies in comparative perspective. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
  20. Leal, V. N. (1977). Coronelism: The municipality and representative government in Brazil. (Translated by J. Henfrey) New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Leeds, E. (1996), Cocaine and parallel polities on the Brazilian urban periphery: Constraints on local level democratization. Latin American Research Review 31, 47–83.Google Scholar
  22. Leeds, A., & Leeds, E. (1978). A sociologia do Brasil urbano. Rio de Janeiro: Zahar Editores.Google Scholar
  23. Mainwaring, S. (1995). Brazil: Weak parties, feckless democracy. In S. Mainwaring, & T. Scully (Eds.), Building democratic institutions: Party systems in Latin America. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Mainwaring, S. (1999). Rethinking party systems in the third wave of democratization: The case of Brazil. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  25. O’Donnell, G. (1993). On the state, democratization and some conceptual problems: A Latin American view with glances at some postcommunist countries. World Development 21, 1355–1369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. O’Donnell, Guillermo. (1998). Polyarchies and the (Un) Rule of Law in Latin America: A Partial Conclusion. In J. E. Méndez, G. O’Donnell, and P. S. Pinheiro, (Eds.). The (un) rule of law and the underprivileged in Latin America. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
  27. Perlman, J. (1976). The myth of marginality: Urban poverty and politics in Rio de Janeiro. Berkeley, CA: University of California.Google Scholar
  28. Perlman, J. (2004). Marginality: From myth to reality in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro, 1969–2002”. In A. Roy & N. A., (Eds.). Urban informality: Transnational perspectives from the Middle East, Latin America, and South Asia, pp. 105–146. New York: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
  29. Schmidt, S., Guasti, L., Landé, C., & J. Scott (Eds.) (1977). Friends, followers, and factions: A reader in political clientelism. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  30. Scott, J., & Kerkvliet B. (1977). How traditional rural patrons lose legitimacy: A theory with special reference to Southeast Asia. In S. Schmidt, L. Guasti, C. Landé, & J. Scott (Eds.), Friends, followers, and factions: A reader in political clientelism. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  31. Sives, A. (2002). Changing patrons, from politicians to drug don: Clientelism in downtown Kingston, Jamaica. Latin American Perspectives 29, 66–89.Google Scholar
  32. Small, G. (1995). Ruthless: The global rise of the Yardies. London: Warner Books.Google Scholar
  33. Stokes, S. (1995). Cultures in conflict: Social movements and the state in Peru. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  34. Stolzoff, N. (2000). Wake the town and tell the people: Dancehall culture in Jamaica. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Enrique Desmond Arias
    • 1
  1. 1.John Jay College of Criminal JusticeCity University of New YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations