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Radical Outcasts Versus Three Kinds of Police: Constructing Limits in Japanese Anti-Emperor Protests

  • Patricia G. Steinhoff

How are the limits of dissent negotiated by protesters and police within protest demonstrations? How are messages about the protest conveyed to the general public through this interaction? Research on political protests and riots in the USA and Europe has called attention to the interaction between police behavior and participants’ responses to it (Kerner 1968; Marx 1970; Reiss 1971; Sykes and Brent 1980; McPhail et al. 1998; della Porta and Reiter 1998b; McPhail and McCarthy 2005). Differences in the organization and training of the police, in legal systems, and in cultural attitudes toward authority, conflict, and interpersonal space, may affect the style and outcomes of police–demonstrator encounters (della Porta and Reiter 1998a).

Keywords

Social Movement Security Police Uniformed Police Street Demonstration Protest Event 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia G. Steinhoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of HawaiiHawaii

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