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Traumatic Brain Injuries in Children

Advances in pediatric neuroscience have significantly improved our understanding of the consequences of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in recent years. However, the vast majority of questions involving the functioning and recovery of a human brain post-head injury remain unanswered. It is still a significant problem to find the threshold of damage in the child brain versus the adult brain as a result of TBI. We are still unclear about biological predispositions to residuals of head injury after a single episode of concussion in children. We still do not know the optimal period of time required for a full recovery after concussion. Overall, there are no validated criteria at this time in terms of return to sport participation by children suffering from TBI. These are just a few questions that many clinicians and researchers struggle to resolve in order to understand the nature of concussion in children. We hope that gaining more knowledge in these areas will allow us to influence this process at an earlier stage in an attempt to stop the process of brain tissue damage and to speed up its recovery.

It should be noted that much previous research on concussion has been at the stage of animal models. Moreover, most of our knowledge about concussive processes in a human brain involves the adult brain, which has completed its developmental cycle and does not offer much variation in terms of anatomical and functional plasticity. There is even less known about neurodynamics of concussive processes and recovery in children, whose young brain remains in a state of constant developmental changes. There is an enormous amount of variation, introduced into the picture of pediatric concussion that has to do with the brain’s developmental phase at the time of the child’s injury, its capacity for plasticity and adaptation to the injury, and other factors. This issue becomes even more complicated when we attempt to determine the effects of mild head injury on a still developing young brain.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Head Injury Head Trauma Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Closed Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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