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Cereals pp 267-287 | Cite as

Triticale: A “New” Crop with Old Challenges

  • M. Mergoum
  • P.K. Singh
  • R.J. Peña
  • A.J. Lozano-del Río
  • K.V. Cooper
  • D.F. Salmon
  • H. Gómez Macpherson
Chapter
Part of the Handbook of Plant Breeding book series (HBPB, volume 3)

Abstract

Triticale (X Triticosecale), a Man-made cereal grass crop obtained from hybridization of wheat (Triticum spp) with rye (Secale cereale). The hope was that triticale would combine the high yield potential and good grain quality of wheat, and the resistance/tolerance to the biotic and abiotic stresses of rye. Triticale grains can be used for human food and livestock feed. Since the last century, triticale has received significant attention as a potential energy crop. Today, research is currently being conducted includes the use of this crop biomass in bio-energy production. The aim of a triticale breeding programs mainly focuses on the improvement of economic traits such as grain yield, biomass, nutritional factors, plant height, as well as traits such as early maturity and high grain volume weight. Intense breeding and selection have made very rapid genetic improvements in triticale seed quality. The agronomic advantages and improved end-use properties of the triticale grains over wheat achieved by research and development efforts make triticale an attractive option for increasing global food production particularly, for marginal and stress-prone growing conditions. Details of the different breeding approaches utilized to enhance modern triticale cultivars for various uses are discussed in this chapter.

Keywords

Double Haploid Specific Combine Ability Winter Type Triticale Breeding Hexaploid Triticale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Mergoum
    • 1
  • P.K. Singh
    • 1
  • R.J. Peña
    • 1
  • A.J. Lozano-del Río
    • 1
  • K.V. Cooper
    • 1
  • D.F. Salmon
    • 1
  • H. Gómez Macpherson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant Sciences, NDSU Dept. 7670North Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA

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