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Managing Fertility in Childhood Cancer Patients

  • Kimberley J. Dilley
Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 138)

The scope of potential fertility issues for pediatric cancer patients is broad and difficult to predict. Both genders are susceptible to central dysregulation of the hypothalamic axis. For boys, chemotherapy and radiation can affect production of both sex hormones and sperm. These effects can be reversible or permanent. For girls, the ovary can be similarly affected, with inadequate or absent hormone production and depletion of ovarian follicle reserve. Additionally, even in a young woman with normal puberty and early fertility, premature menopause is a possibility after certain exposures. Finally, the uterus can be affected by radiation and create problems in carrying a normal pregnancy to term, even if hormonal fertility is achieved.

Keywords

Total Body Irradiation Fertility Preservation Pediatric Cancer Patient Premature Menopause Childhood Cancer Survivor Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kimberley J. Dilley
    • 1
  1. 1.Northwestern UniversityChicagoUSA

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