Advertisement

Oncofertility Consortium Consensus Statement: Guidelines for Ovarian Tissue Cryopreservation

  • Leilah E. Backhus
  • Laxmi A. Kondapalli
  • R. Jeffrey Chang
  • Christos Coutifaris
  • Ralph Kazer
  • Teresa K. Woodruff
Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 138)

In vitro fertilization (IVF) and storage of the resulting embryos is currently a proven method of fertility preservation for women who face an immediate threat to their future fertility. This method, however, is suitable for a fraction of patients and depends on a number of factors that may include her diagnosis, age, partner status, willingness to accept donor sperm, desire to freeze embryos, and ability to pay for these services. As fertility preservation techniques evolve, it is critical that physicians continue to evaluate practice guidelines in order to offer a wider menu of fertility preservation options tailored to each patient’s specific clinical scenario, to the risk-benefit ratio and takes into consideration the patient’s values.

Keywords

Ovarian Stimulation Ovarian Reserve Fertility Preservation Embryo Cryopreservation Oocyte Cryopreservation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Fertility preservation and reproduction in cancer patients. Fertil Steril 2005;83:1622–1628.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Practice Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the Committee of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology. Ovarian tissue and oocyte cryopreservation. Fertil Steril 2006;86:S142–S147.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lee SJ, Schover LR, Partridge AH, et al. American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations of fertility preservation in cancer patients. J Clin Oncol 2006;24:2917–2931.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Wallace WHB, Anderson RA, Irvine DS. Fertility preservation for young patients with cancer: who is at risk and what can be offered? Lancet Oncol. 2005;4:209–218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Robertson JA. Cancer and fertility: ethical and legal challenges. J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr 2005;34:104–106.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Oktay K, Buyuk E, Davis O, et al. Fertility preservation in breast cancer patients: IVF and embryo cryopreservation after ovarian stimulation with tamoxifen. Hum Reprod 2003;18:90–95.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Oktay, K. Further evidence on the safety and success of ovarian stimulation with letrozole and tamoxifen in breast cancer patients undergoing in vitro fertilization to cryopreserve their embryos for fertility preservation. J Clin Oncol 2005;23:3858–3859.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Oktay K, Buyuk E, Libertella N, et al. Fertility preservation in breast cancer patients: a prospective controlled comparison of ovarian stimulation with tamoxifen and letrozole for embryo cryopreservation. J Clin Oncol 2005;23:4347–4353.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leilah E. Backhus
    • 1
  • Laxmi A. Kondapalli
    • 2
  • R. Jeffrey Chang
    • 3
  • Christos Coutifaris
  • Ralph Kazer
    • 2
  • Teresa K. Woodruff
    • 4
  1. 1.University of ChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Northwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  3. 3.University of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA
  4. 4.Institute for Women's Health Research, Feinberg School of MedicineNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA

Personalised recommendations