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Disparity Between Yersinia pestis and Yersinia enterocolitica O:8 in YopJ/YopP-Dependent Functions

  • Emanuelle Mamroud
  • Ayelet Zauberman
  • Avigdor Shafferman
  • Sara Cohen
  • Yehuda Flashner
  • Baruch Velan
Part of the Advances In Experimental Medicine And Biology book series (AEMB, volume 603)

YopP in Y. enterocolitica and YopJ in Y. pseudotuberculosis, have been shown to exert a variety of adverse effects on cell signaling leading to suppression of cytokine expression and induction of programmed cell death. A comparative in vitro study with Y. pestis and Y. enterocolitica O:8 virulent strains shows some critical disparity in YopJ/YopP-related effects on immune cells. Involvement of yopJ in virulence was evaluated in mouse model of bubonic plague.

Keywords

Infected Macrophage Yersinia Enterocolitica Yersinia Pestis Yersinia Species Enterocolitica Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emanuelle Mamroud
    • 1
  • Ayelet Zauberman
    • 1
  • Avigdor Shafferman
    • 1
  • Sara Cohen
    • 1
  • Yehuda Flashner
    • 1
  • Baruch Velan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular GeneticsIsrael Institute for Biological ResearchIsrael

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