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The Insect Toxin Complex of Yersinia

  • Nick Waterfield
  • Michelle Hares
  • Richard ffrench-Constant
  • Brendan W. Wren
  • Stewart Hinchliffe
Part of the Advances In Experimental Medicine And Biology book series (AEMB, volume 603)

Many members of the Yersinia genus encode homologues of insect toxins first observed in bacteria that are insect pathogens such as Photorhabdus, Xenorhabdus and Serratia entomophila. These bacteria secrete high molecular weight insecticidal toxins comprised of multiple protein subunits, termed the Toxin Complexes or Tc’s. In Photorhabdus three distinct Tc subunits are required for full oral toxicity in insects, that include the [A], [B] and [C] types, although the exact stochiometry remains unclear. The genomes of Photorhabdus strains encode multiple tc loci, although only two have been shown to exhibit oral and injectable activity against the Hawk Moth, Manduca sexta. The exact role of the remaining homologues is unclear. The availability of bacterial genome sequences has revealed the presence of tc gene homologues in many different species. In this chapter we review the tc gene homologues in Yersinia genus. We discuss what is known about the activity of the Yersinia Tc protein homologues and attempt to relate this to the evolution of the genus and of the tca gene family

Keywords

Yersinia Enterocolitica Oral Toxicity Yersinia Pestis Insecticidal Toxin Toxin Complex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nick Waterfield
    • 1
  • Michelle Hares
    • 2
  • Richard ffrench-Constant
    • 2
  • Brendan W. Wren
    • 3
  • Stewart Hinchliffe
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biology and BiochemistryUniversity of BathUK
  2. 2.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of ExeterUK
  3. 3.Department of Infectious and Tropical DiseasesLondon School of Hygiene and Tropical MedicineUK

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