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Intergroup Positioning and Power

  • Winnifred R. Louis
Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS)

Keywords

Social Influence Social Identity Story Line Intergroup Relation Position Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Refernces

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2008

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  • Winnifred R. Louis

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