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An Update on Zooarchaeology and Historical Archaeology: Progress and Prospects

  • David B. Landon
Chapter

This chapter reviews the development, practice, and results of zooarchaeological research in historical archaeology. Zooarchaeology, or faunal analysis, is the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. The study of animal bones from sites has become an established subdiscipline in archaeology with a large and growing literature (for overviews, see O’Connor, 2000; Reitz and Wing, 1999). Zooarchaeologists studying faunal collections from the historical period typically use many of the same methods and explore the same issues as zooarchaeologists studying collections from other time periods and locations.

Keywords

Historical Archaeology Taphonomic Process Subsistence Practice Archaeological Interpretation Bone Assemblage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Some of the ideas in this chapter were first developed for a visiting lecture at the Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, and I am grateful to Walter Klippel for that opportunity. The initial research took place as part of a research fellowship in the Archaeobiology Laboratory of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History, where my work was enhanced by the generosity of Melinda Zeder with source materials and inspiration. Thanks to Melinda Zeder and Larry McKee for reading and commenting on an earlier version of this chapter, and thanks also to Elizabeth Scott and Terrance Martin for their review comments on this chapter. Any errors of fact or interpretation remain my own.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Anthropology, University of MassachusettsAndrew Fiske Memorial Center for Archaeological ResearchBostonUSA

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