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Landscape Approaches in Historical Archaeology: The Archaeology of Places

  • Nicole Branton
Chapter

Landscape archaeology is a framework for modeling the ways that people in the past conceptualized, organized, and manipulated their environments and the ways that those places have shaped their occupants’ behaviors and identities. Landscape archaeology is concerned with both the natural and the human-built environment, as well as places that are strictly symbolic. The landscapes in landscape archaeology may be as small as a single household or garden or as large as an empire. They may also include a number of alternate landscapes nested within them.

Keywords

Cultural Landscape Oral History Historical Archaeology Landscape Approach Heritage Archaeology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Arapajo and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National GrasslandUSA

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