Advertisement

Natives and Newcomers in the Antipodes: Historical Archaeology in Australia and New Zealand

  • Susan Lawrence
  • Peter Davies
Chapter

Settler societies in Australia and New Zealand have long had close relationships founded on shared histories as former British colonies on the remote edge of the empire. Both places are largely the product of nineteenth-century colonization, although Australia has a longer postcontact history that began with the Dutch in the seventeenth century and was followed much later by permanent British settlement at Sydney in 1788. In New Zealand, sporadic settlement by missionaries and whaling parties took place from the early years of the nineteenth century; the country was formally annexed by Britain in 1840. The period of documented history in both countries is relatively short, and the archaeological record of that period is shaped by the influences of global economies and industrial technologies that were already well established.

Keywords

Western Australia Historical Archaeology Archaeological Excavation Heritage Management Historic Place 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Allen, J., 1973, The Archaeology of Nineteenth Century British Imperialism: An Australian Case-Study. World Archaeology 5:44–60.Google Scholar
  2. Atkinson, M., 2001, Keeping the Land Clean: An Historical Archaeology of Landscape and Garden Creation at Murrungowar, Victoria. Studies in the History of Gardens and Designed Landscapes 21(1):19–26.Google Scholar
  3. Austral Archaeology, 1992, Archaeological Report on the Rookery Site. Report for the Corporation of the City of Adelaide. Austral Archaeology, Adelaide and Stanmore.Google Scholar
  4. Austral Archaeology, 1995, Blundstone Boot Factory Excavations. Report for Works Tasmania. Austral Archaeology, Adelaide and Stanmore.Google Scholar
  5. Bairstow, D., 1984a, Historical Archaeology at the Crossroads: An Appraisal of Theoretical Considerations. Australian Archaeology 18:32–9.Google Scholar
  6. Bairstow, D., 1984b, The Swiss Family Robinson Model: A Comment and Appraisal. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 2:3–6.Google Scholar
  7. Bairstow, D., 1991, Urban Archaeology: American Theory, Australian Practice. Australian Archaeology 33:52–58.Google Scholar
  8. Balme, J., and Paterson, A., editors, 2006, Archaeology in Practice: A Student Guide to Archaeological Analyses. Blackwell, Malden, Massachusetts.Google Scholar
  9. Bannear, D., 1988, The Interpretation of Structural Remains at Bolla Bollana Copper Smelting Works, South Australia. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 6:20–25.Google Scholar
  10. Bavin, L., 1996, The Punishment Administered. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Archaeology, University of Western Australia, Perth.Google Scholar
  11. Bell, P., 1986, Gold, Iron and Steam: The Industrial Archaeology of the Palmer Goldfield. James Cook University, Townsville, Northern Queensland.Google Scholar
  12. Best, E., 1921, Old Redoubts, Blockhouses, and Stockades of the Wellington District. Transactions of the New Zealand Institute 53:14–28.Google Scholar
  13. Best, E., 1927, The Pa Maori. Bulletin No. 6. Dominion Museum, Wellington, New Zealand.Google Scholar
  14. Bickford, A., 1991, The Australian ICOMOS Charter (the Burra Charter) and First Government House. In A Heritage Handbook, edited by G. Davison and C. McConville, pp. 38–42. Allen and Unwin, Sydney.Google Scholar
  15. Bickford, A., 1996, The Archaeological Project 1983–1990. In Sites, Nailing the Debate: Archaeology and Interpretation in Museums, pp. 65–74. Museum of Sydney, Sydney.Google Scholar
  16. Birmingham, J., 1976, The Archaeological Contribution to Nineteenth-Century History: Some Australian Case Studies. World Archaeology 7:306–317.Google Scholar
  17. Birmingham, J., 1992, Wybalenna: The Archaeology of Cultural Accommodation in Nineteenth Century Tasmania. Australian Society for Historical Archaeology, Sydney.Google Scholar
  18. Birmingham, J., Jack, R.I., and Jeans, D.N., 1979, Australian Pioneer Technology: Sites and Relics. Heinemann, Richmond, Victoria.Google Scholar
  19. Birmingham, J., Jack, R.I., and Jeans, D.N., 1983, Industrial Archaeology in Australia—Rural Industry. Heinemann, Melbourne.Google Scholar
  20. Birmingham, J., and Jeans, D., 1983, The Swiss Family Robinson and the Archaeology of Colonizations. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 1:3–14.Google Scholar
  21. Birmingham, J., and Murray, T., 1987, Historical Archaeology in Australia: A Handbook. Australian Society for Historical Archaeology, Sydney.Google Scholar
  22. Brooks, A., 2005, An Archaeological Guide to British Ceramics in Australia 1788–1901. Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology, Sydney, and La Trobe University Archaeology Program, Victoria.Google Scholar
  23. Burke, H., and Smith, C., 2004, The Archaeologist’s Field Handbook. Allen and Unwin, Sydney.Google Scholar
  24. Byrne, M., 1976, Ross Bridge, Tasmania. Studies in Historical Archaeology, No. 3. Australian Society for Historical Archaeology, Sydney.Google Scholar
  25. Byrne, D., 2003, The Ethos of Return: Erasure and Reinstatement of Aboriginal Visibility in the Australian Historical Landscape. Historical Archaeology 37(1):73–86.Google Scholar
  26. Casella, E.C., 2000, ‘Doing Trade’: A Sexual Economy of Nineteenth-Century Australian Female Convict Prisons. World Archaeology 32:209–221.Google Scholar
  27. Casella, E., 2002, Archaeology of the Ross Female Factory: Female Incarceration in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston, Tasmania.Google Scholar
  28. Clough, R., 1989, Documents and Digs: Investigation of the Copper and Clay Industries in New Zealand. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 7:3–9.Google Scholar
  29. Clough, R., 1991, The Archaeology of the Historic Copper Industry on Kawau Island 1843–1855, 1899–1901. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 9:45–48.Google Scholar
  30. Colley, S., and Bickford, A., 1996, ‘Real’ Aborigines and ‘Real’ Archaeology: Aboriginal Places and Australian Historical Archaeology. World Archaeological Bulletin 7:5–21.Google Scholar
  31. Connah, G., 1983, Stamp-Collecting or Increasing Understanding?: The Dilemma of Historical Archaeology. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 1:15–21.Google Scholar
  32. Connah, G., 1988, The Archaeology of Australia’s History. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  33. Connah, G., 1998, Pattern and Purpose in Historical Archaeology. Australasian Historical Archaeology 16:3–7.Google Scholar
  34. Coutts, P., 1972, The Emergence of the Foveaux Straits Maori from Prehistory. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.Google Scholar
  35. Crook, P., Ellmoos, L., and Murray, T., 2005, Keeping Up with the McNamaras: A Historical Archaeological Study of the Cumberland and Gloucester Streets Site, The Rocks, Sydney. Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales, Sydney.Google Scholar
  36. Crook, P., Lawrence, S., and Gibbs, M., 2002, The Role of Artefact Catalogues in Australian Historical Archaeology: A Framework for Discussion. Australasian Historical Archaeology 20:26–38.Google Scholar
  37. Crook, P., and Murray, T., 2006a, An Archaeology of Institutional Refuge: The Material Culture of the Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney, 1848–1886. Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales, Sydney.Google Scholar
  38. Crook, P., and Murray, T., 2006b, The Historical Archaeology of the First Government House Site, Sydney. Archaeology of the Modern City Series, vol. 11. Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales, Sydney.Google Scholar
  39. Culican, W., and Taylor, J., 1972, Fossil Beach Cement Works, Mornington, Victoria: An Essay in Industrial Archaeology. Refulgence, Deception Bay, Queensland.Google Scholar
  40. Davey, C., 1986, The History and Archaeology of the North British Mine Site, Maldon, Victoria. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 4:51–56.Google Scholar
  41. Davies, M., 1987, The Archaeology of Standing Structures. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 5:54–64.Google Scholar
  42. Davies, M., and Buckley, K., 1987, Archaeological Procedures Manual. Occasional Papers, No. 13. Department of Lands, Parks, and Wildlife, Hobart.Google Scholar
  43. Davies, P., 2002, “A Little World Apart … ”: Domestic Consumption at a Victorian Forest Sawmill. Australasian Historical Archaeology 20:58–66.Google Scholar
  44. Davies, P., 2005, Space and Structure at an Australian Timber Camp. Historical Archaeology 39(4):59–72.Google Scholar
  45. Egloff, B., 1984, Cultural Resource Management, a View from Port Arthur Historic Site. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 2:73–79.Google Scholar
  46. Egloff, B., 1994, From Swiss Family Robinson to Sir Russell Drysdale: Towards Changing the Tone of Historical Archaeology in Australia. Australian Archaeology 39:1–9.Google Scholar
  47. Gibbs, M., 1995, The Historical Archaeology of Shore Based Whaling in Western Australia 1836–1879. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of Western Australia, Perth.Google Scholar
  48. Gibbs, M., 1997, Early Metal Processing in Western Australia: The Warribanno Lead Smelter. Australasian Historical Archaeology 15:65–74.Google Scholar
  49. Gibbs, M., 2005, The Archaeology of Subsistence on the Maritime Frontier: Faunal Analysis of the Cheyne Beach Whaling Station 1845–1877. Australasian Historical Archaeology 23:115–122.Google Scholar
  50. Green, J., 1989, The Loss of the Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie Retourschip Batavia, Western Australia 1629: An Excavation Report and Catalogue of Artefacts. BAR International Series 489. British Archaeological Reports, Oxford.Google Scholar
  51. Grimwade, G., 2003, Gold, Gardens, Temples and Feasts: Chinese Temple, Croydon, Queensland. Australasian Historical Archaeology 21:50–57.Google Scholar
  52. Groube, L., 1966, Rescue Excavations in the Bay of Islands. New Zealand Archaeological Association Newsletter 9(3):108–114.Google Scholar
  53. Harrington, J., 2000, An Archaeological and Historical Overview of Limeburning in Victoria. Heritage Council Victoria, Melbourne.Google Scholar
  54. Harrison, R., 2002, Archaeology and the Colonial Encounter: Kimberley Spearpoints, Cultural Identity and Masculinity in the North of Australia. Journal of Social Archaeology 2:352–377.Google Scholar
  55. Harrison, R., 2004a, Contact Archaeology and the Landscapes of Pastoralism in the North-West of Australia. In The Archaeology of Contact in Settler Societies, edited by T. Murray, pp. 109–143. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  56. Harrison, R., 2004b, Shared Landscapes: Archaeologies of Attachment and the Pastoral Industry in New South Wales. University of New South Wales Press, Sydney.Google Scholar
  57. Harrison, R., 2006, An Artefact of Colonial Desire? Kimberley Points and the Technologies of Enchantment. Current Anthropology 47:63–88.Google Scholar
  58. Harrison, R., and Williamson, C., editors, 2004, After Captain Cook: The Archaeology of the Indigenous Recent Past in Australia. AltaMira Press, Walnut Creek, California.Google Scholar
  59. Henderson, G., 1986, Maritime Archaeology in Australia. University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands, Western Australia.Google Scholar
  60. Higginbotham, E., 1985, Excavation Techniques in Historical Archaeology. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 3:8–14.Google Scholar
  61. Higginbotham, E., 1987, The Excavation of Buildings in the Early Township of Parramatta, New South Wales, 1790–1820s. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 5:3–20.Google Scholar
  62. Hosty, K., and Stuart, I., 1994, Maritime Archaeology over the Last Twenty Years. Australian Archaeology 39:9–18.Google Scholar
  63. Hourani, P., 1990, Spatial Organisation and the Status of Women in Nineteenth Century Australia. Australasian Historical Archaeology 8:70–77.Google Scholar
  64. Iacono, N., 2006, Research Outcomes in Australian Historical Archaeology: Cutting Edge or Cutting Corners? Australasian Historical Archaeology 24:77–85.Google Scholar
  65. Ireland, T., 2002, Giving Value to the Australian Historic Past: Historical Archaeology, Heritage and Nationalism. Australasian Historical Archaeology 20:15–25.Google Scholar
  66. Jack, R.I., 1980, Colonial Archaeology in Australia. Australian Archaeology 11:18–24.Google Scholar
  67. Jack, R.I., 1985, The Archaeology of Colonial Australia. In Comparative Studies in the Archaeology of Colonialism, edited by S.L. Dyson, pp. 153–76. BAR International Series 233. British Archaeological Reports, Oxford.Google Scholar
  68. Jack, R.I., 1993, Historical Archaeology and the Historian. Australasian Historical Archaeology 11:130–138.Google Scholar
  69. Jack, R.I., and Cremin, A., 1994, Australia’s Age of Iron. Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, and Sydney University Press, Sydney.Google Scholar
  70. Jack, R.I., Holmes, K., and Kerr, R., 1984, Ah Toy’s Garden: A Chinese Market-Garden on the Palmer River Goldfield, North Queensland. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 2:51–58.Google Scholar
  71. Jackman, G., 2001, Get Thee to Church: Hard Work, Godliness and Tourism at Australia’s First Rural Reformatory. Australasian Historical Archaeology 19:6–13.Google Scholar
  72. Karskens, G., 1984, The Convict Road Station Site at Wiseman’s Ferry: An Historical and Archaeological Investigation. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 2:17–26.Google Scholar
  73. Karskens, G., 1986, Defiance, Deference, and Diligence: Three Views of Convicts in New South Wales Road Gangs. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 4:17–28.Google Scholar
  74. Karskens, G., 1999, Inside the Rocks: The Archaeology of a Neighbourhood. Hale and Iremonger, Sydney.Google Scholar
  75. Karskens, G., 2003, Revisiting the Worldview: The Archaeology of Convict Households in Sydney’s Rocks Neighborhood. Historical Archaeology 37(1):34–55.Google Scholar
  76. Karskens, G., and Thorpe, W., 1992, History and Archaeology in Sydney: Towards Integration and Interpretation. Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society 78(3–4):52–75.Google Scholar
  77. Kerr, J., 1984, Design for Convicts. Library of Australian History, National Trust of Australia (NSW), and Australian Society for Historical Archaeology, Sydney.Google Scholar
  78. Kostoglou, P., and McCarthy, J., 1991, Whaling and Sealing Sites in South Australia. Special Publications, No. 6. Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology, n.l.Google Scholar
  79. Lawrence, S., 1995, Poor Man’s Diggings: Subsistence Mining in the Nineteenth Century. Australasian Historical Archaeology 13:59–68.Google Scholar
  80. Lawrence, S., 1998, Approaches to Gender in the Archaeology of Mining. In Redefining Archaeology: Feminist Perspectives, edited by M. Casey and J. Hope, pp. 126–133. ANH Publications, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, Canberra.Google Scholar
  81. Lawrence, S., 1999, Towards a Feminist Archaeology of Households: Gender and Household Structure on the Australian Goldfields. In The Archaeology of Household Activities, edited by P. Allison, pp. 121–141. Plenum Press, New York.Google Scholar
  82. Lawrence, S., 2000, Dolly’s Creek: An Archaeology of a Victorian Goldfields Community. Melbourne University Press, Melbourne.Google Scholar
  83. Lawrence, S., 2006, Whalers and Freemen: Life on Colonial Whaling Stations. Australian Scholarly Publishing, Melbourne.Google Scholar
  84. Lawrence, S., editor, 2003, Archaeologies of the British: Explorations of Identity in Great Britain and Its Colonies 1600–1945. Routledge, London and New York.Google Scholar
  85. Lawrence, S., and Staniforth, M., editors, 1998, The Archaeology of Whaling in Southern Australia and New Zealand. Special Publication, No. 10. Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology, n.l.Google Scholar
  86. Lydon, J., 1995, Gender in Australian Historical Archaeology. In Gendered Archaeology: The Second Australian Women in Archaeology Conference, edited by J. Balme and W. Beck, pp. 72–79. ANH Publications, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, Canberra.Google Scholar
  87. Lydon, J., 1996, Sites: Archaeology in Context. In Sites, Nailing the Debate: Archaeology and Interpretation in Museums, pp. 139–162. Museum of Sydney, Sydney.Google Scholar
  88. Lydon, J., 1999, Many Inventions: The Chinese in the Rocks, Sydney, 1890–1930. Monash Publications in History, Monash University, Victoria.Google Scholar
  89. Lydon, J., 2005a, Eye Contact: Photographing Indigenous Australians. Duke University Press, Durham, North Carolina.Google Scholar
  90. Lydon, J., 2005b, ‘Our Sense of Beauty’: Visuality, Space and Gender on Victoria’s Aboriginal Reserves, South-Eastern Australia. History and Anthropology 16:211–233.Google Scholar
  91. Mackay, R., and Karskens, G., 1999, Historical Archaeology: Historical or Hysterical? Crisis or Creative Awakening? Australasian Historical Archaeology 17:110–115.Google Scholar
  92. MacReady, S., 1991, A Review of Urban Historical Archaeology in Auckland to 1990. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 9:14–20.Google Scholar
  93. McCarthy, J., 1989, Archaeological Investigation: Commonwealth Offices and Telecom Corporate Building Sites, The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne, Victoria. Submitted to the Department of Administrative Services and Telecom Australia, Melbourne.Google Scholar
  94. McGowan, A., 1989, Salvage Excavation on Convict-Built Reclaimed Land, Sarah Island. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 7:10–15.Google Scholar
  95. McGowan, B., 1996, The Typology and Techniques of Alluvial Mining: The Example of the Shoalhaven and Mongarlowe Goldfields in Southern New South Wales. Australasian Historical Archaeology 14:34–45.Google Scholar
  96. McGowan, B., 2001, Mullock Heaps and Tailing Mounds: Environmental Effects of Alluvial Goldmining. In Gold: Forgotten Histories and Lost Objects of Australia, edited by I. McCalman, A. Cook, and A. Reeves, pp. 85–100. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  97. McIlroy, J., 1989, Excavations at the New and Old Penitentiaries, Sarah Island Historic Site. Occasional Paper, No. 18. Department of Lands, Parks, and Wildlife, Hobart, Tasmania.Google Scholar
  98. Marquis-Kyle, P., and Walker, M., 1992, The Illustrated Burra Charter: Making Good Decisions about the Care of Important Places. Australia International Council on Monuments and Sites, n.l.Google Scholar
  99. Megaw, J.V.S.M., 1984, The Archaeology of Rubbish or Rubbishing Archaeology: Backward Looks and Forward Glances. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 2:7–12.Google Scholar
  100. Middleton, A., 2008, Te Puna: A New Zealand Mission Station: Historical Archaeology in New Zealand. Springer, New York.Google Scholar
  101. Milner, P., 1997, Beam Pumping Engines in Victoria. Australasian Historical Archaeology 15:18–27.Google Scholar
  102. Mulvaney, J., 1996, ‘Musing Amidst the Ruins.’ Australasian Historical Archaeology 14:3–8.Google Scholar
  103. Murray, T., 1993, The Childhood of William Lanne: Contact Archaeology and Aboriginality in Northwest Tasmania. Antiquity 67:504–519.Google Scholar
  104. Murray, T., 2002, But that Was Long Ago: Theory in Australian Historical Archaeology 2002. Australasian Historical Archaeology 20:8–14.Google Scholar
  105. Murray, T., 2004a, Exploring the Archaeology of a Vanished Community at ‘Little Lon.’ In Archaeology from Australia, edited by T. Murray, pp. 116–130. Australian Scholarly Publishing, Kew, Victoria.Google Scholar
  106. Murray, T., editor, 2004b, The Archaeology of Contact in Settler Societies. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  107. Murray, T., 2006, Integrating Archaeology and History at the “Commonwealth Block”: “Little Lon” and Casseldon Place. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 10:395–413.Google Scholar
  108. Murray, T., and Allen, J., 1986, Theory and the Development of Historical Archaeology in Australia. Archaeology in Oceania 21:85–93.Google Scholar
  109. Murray, T., and Mayne, A., 2001, Imaginary Landscapes: Reading Melbourne’s ‘Little Lon.’ In The Archaeology of Urban Landscapes: Explorations in Slumland, edited by A. Mayne and T. Murray, pp. 89–105. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  110. Murray, T., and Mayne, A., 2003, (Re) Constructing a Lost Community: “Little Lon,” Melbourne, Australia. In Recent Work in Historical Archaeology in Australia and New Zealand, edited by S. Lawrence and G. Karskens, pp. 87–101. Historical Archaeology 37(1).Google Scholar
  111. Nash, M., 2001, Cargo for the Colony: The 1797 Wreck of the Merchant Ship Sydney Cove. Navarine, Canberra.Google Scholar
  112. Nash, M., 2005, Investigation of a Survivor Camp from the Sydney Cove Shipwreck. Bulletin of the Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology 29:9–24.Google Scholar
  113. Ng, J., 1993, Chinese Goldseekers in Otago, New Zealand. In Histories of the Chinese in Australasia and the South Pacific: Proceedings of an International Public Conference Held at the Museum of Chinese Australian History Melbourne, 8–10 October 1993, edited by P. MacGregor, pp. 161–167. Museum of Chinese Australian History, Melbourne.Google Scholar
  114. Nutley, D., 1995, More than a Shipwreck: The Convict Ship Hive—Aboriginal and European Contact Site. Paper Presented at the Joint Conference of the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and the Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology, Hobart.Google Scholar
  115. Paterson, A.G., 2005, Early Pastoral Landscapes and Culture Contact in Central Australia. In Landscapes of Industrial Labor, edited by M. Cassell, pp. 28–48. Historical Archaeology 39(3).Google Scholar
  116. Paterson, A.G., 2006, Towards a Historical Archaeology of Western Australia’s Northwest. Australasian Historical Archaeology 24:99–111.Google Scholar
  117. Paterson, A.G., 2008, The Lost Legions: Culture Contact in Colonial Australia. AltaMira Press, Lanham, Maryland.Google Scholar
  118. Paterson, A.G., and Franklin, D., 2004, The 1629 Mass Grave for Batavia Victims, Beacon Island, Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia. Australasian Historical Archaeology 22:71–78.Google Scholar
  119. Pearson, M., 1983, The Technology of Whaling in Australian Waters in the Nineteenth Century. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 1:40–54.Google Scholar
  120. Pearson, M., 1984, The Excavation of the Mount Wood Woolscour, Tibooburra, N.S.W. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 2:38–50.Google Scholar
  121. Pearson, M., 1990, The Lime Burning Industry in Australia: An Overview. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 8:28–35.Google Scholar
  122. Pearson, M., 1993, The Good Oil: Eucalyptus Oil Distilleries in Australia. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 11:99–107.Google Scholar
  123. Pearson, M., and Sullivan, S., 1995, Looking After Heritage Places: The Basics of Heritage Planning for Managers, Landowners and Administrators. Melbourne University Press, Melbourne.Google Scholar
  124. Pearson, M., and Temple, H., editors, 1983, Historical Archaeology and Conservation Philosophy. Heritage Council of New South Wales, Sydney.Google Scholar
  125. Pearson, W., 1998, Water-Powered Flourmilling on the New England Tablelands of New South Wales. Australasian Historical Archaeology 16:30–44.Google Scholar
  126. Piper, A., 1988, Chinese Diet and Cultural Conservatism in Nineteenth Century Southern New Zealand. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 6:34–42.Google Scholar
  127. Prickett, N., 1981, The Archaeology of a Military Frontier: Taranaki, New Zealand, 1860–1881. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of Auckland.Google Scholar
  128. Prickett, N., 1992, The Archaeology of the New Zealand Wars. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 10:3–14.Google Scholar
  129. Prickett, N., 1994, Archaeological Excavations at the Omata Stockade and Warea Redoubt, Taranaki. Monograph, No. 20. New Zealand Archaeological Association, Dunedin.Google Scholar
  130. Prickett, N., 2002, The Archaeology of New Zealand Shore Whaling. Department of Conservation, Wellington.Google Scholar
  131. Proudfoot, H., Bickford, A., Egloff, B., and Stocks, R., 1991, Australia’s First Government House. Department of Planning, New South Wales, and Allen and Unwin, Sydney.Google Scholar
  132. Ritchie, N., 1981, Archaeological Interpretation of Alluvial Gold Tailing Sites, Central Otago, New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Archaeology 3:57–69.Google Scholar
  133. Ritchie, N., 1986, Archaeology and History of the Chinese in Southern New Zealand During the Nineteenth Century. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of Otago, New Zealand.Google Scholar
  134. Ritchie, N., 1991, An Introduction to Historical Archaeology in New Zealand. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 9:3–5.Google Scholar
  135. Ritchie, N., 1993, Form and Adaptation: Nineteenth Century Chinese Miners’ Dwellings in Southern New Zealand. In Hidden Heritage: Historical Archaeology of the Overseas Chinese, edited by P. Wegars, pp. 333–371. Baywood, Amityville, New York.Google Scholar
  136. Ritchie, N., 2003, Taking Stock: 20 Years of Australasian “Overseas Chinese Archaeology.” Australasian Historical Archaeology 2:4–10.Google Scholar
  137. Ritchie, N., and Park, S., 1987, Chinese Coins Down Under: Their Role on the New Zealand Goldfields. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 5:41–48.Google Scholar
  138. Rogers, B., 1984, Innovation in the Manufacture of Salt in Eastern Australia: The ‘Thorn Graduation’ Process. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 2:59–72.Google Scholar
  139. Rogers, B., 1993, Nineteenth Century Salt Manufacturing Sites in Tasmania. Joint Publication of the Science and Technology Analysis Research Programme, University of Wollongong; and the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology, Sydney.Google Scholar
  140. Smith, I., 1991, The Development of Historical Archaeology in New Zealand 1921–1990. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 9:6–13.Google Scholar
  141. Smith, L., 2003, Identifying Chinese Ethnicity through Material Culture: Archaeological Excavations at Kiandra, NSW. Australasian Historical Archaeology 21:18–29.Google Scholar
  142. Staniforth, M., 1996, Tracing Artefact Trajectories. The Bulletin of the Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology 20(1):13–18.Google Scholar
  143. Staniforth, M., and Nash, M., 1998, Chinese Export Porcelain from the Wreck of the Sydney Cove (1797). Special Publication, No. 12. Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology, n.l.Google Scholar
  144. Stanin, Z., 2004, From Li Chun to Yong Kit: A Market Garden on the Loddon, 1851–1912. Journal of Australian Colonial History 6:15–34.Google Scholar
  145. Strachan, S., 1986, The History and Archaeology of the Sydney Cove Shipwreck (1797): A Resource for Future Site Work. Occasional Papers in Prehistory, No. 5. Australian National University, Canberra.Google Scholar
  146. Stuart, I., 2007, The Surveyors’ Lot: Making Landscapes in New South Wales. Australasian Historical Archaeology 25:43–55.Google Scholar
  147. Sullivan, S., and Bowdler, S., editors, 1984, Site Surveys and Significance Assessment in Australian Archaeology. Department of Prehistory, Research School of Pacific Studies, Australian National University, Canberra.Google Scholar
  148. Tuffin, R., editor, 2004, A Harbour Large Enough to Admit a Whole Fleet: The Maritime History and Archaeology of Port Arthur. Port Arthur Historic Sites Management Authority, Port Arthur, Tasmania.Google Scholar
  149. Wegner, J., 1995, Winding Engines on the Croyden Goldfield: What the Documents Don’t Say. Australasian Historical Archaeology 13:11–17.Google Scholar
  150. Williamson, C., 2004, Finding Meaning in the Patterns: The Analysis of Material Culture from a Contact Site in Tasmania. In After Captain Cook: The Archaeology of the Recent Indigenous Past in Australia, edited by R. Harrison and C. Williamson, pp. 75–101. AltaMira Press, Walnut Creek, California.Google Scholar
  151. Winston-Gregson, J., 1984, People in the Landscape: A Biography of Two Villages. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 2:27–37.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Archaeology Program, La Trobe UniversityVictoriaAustralia

Personalised recommendations