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French Colonial Archaeology

  • Gregory A. Waselkov
Chapter

French colonial archaeology today is largely a North American phenomenon, dominated by Canadian archaeologists (many of whom are francophone) working mostly in Québec and the maritime provinces—an area that originally comprised the colonies of Nouvelle France (New France) and Île Royale. A smaller contingent of archaeologists in the United States studies the southernmost sites of New France and the widely dispersed outposts and towns of the colony of Louisiane (Louisiana) found throughout an area spanning much of the midcontinent. A few French, Canadian, and American archaeologists are beginning to investigate the colonial origins of the French Caribbean and Guyane (French Guiana) (Fig. 1).

Keywords

North America Material Culture Historical Archaeology Caribbean Island French Colonial 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Archaeological StudiesUniversity of South AlabamaMobileUSA

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