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A Sea of Diversity: Historical Archaeology in the Caribbean

  • Douglas V. Armstrong
  • Mark W. Hauser
Chapter

The Caribbean region projects a rich diversity in cultural settings that relate to a complex historical landscape in which local contexts punctuate global trends with unique material expressions. Archaeologists have explored a wide range of social issues and intellectual problems including colonialism, contact, globalization, power, and the complexities of slavery and freedom. This chapter will provide an overview of historical archaeology in the region including a review of research foci, an examination of thematic problems that have been addressed, theoretical approaches that have been used, and perspectives on new trends and ideas that are being explored today (Figs. 1 and 2).

Keywords

Dominican Republic Historical Archaeology Caribbean Region Archaeological Investigation Sugar Estate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This chapter has been enriched and assisted by the contributions of scholars and colleagues engaged in archaeological research throughout the Caribbean region. Particular thanks are extended to E. Kofi Agorsah (Portland State University, and director, Maroon Heritage Research Project), Greg Cook (University of West Florida), Heather Gibson (McGill University and Virginia Commonwealth University), Grant Gilmore (director, St. Eustatius Center for Archaeological Research), Dorrick Gray (Jamaica National Heritage Trust), Donny Hamilton (Texas A&M University, Institute of Nautical Archaeology and Anthropology Department); Jay Haviser (president, International Congress of Caribbean Archaeology; archaeologist, Central Government of the Netherlands Antilles, Ministry of Education, Sport and Culture, Curaçao; and science coordinator for UNESCO Netherlands Antilles National Commission, Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles), Kenneth Kelly (University of South Carolina), Basil Reid (University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago), Paola Schiappacasse (Pantel, del Cueto & Associates, Puerto Rico, and Syracuse University), Kenneth Wild (Virgin Islands National Park), and Christian Williamson (Syracuse University). We are grateful to the editors of this volume for their encouragement, as we have enjoyed this opportunity to reflect back on research that has been completed and forward to research that is ongoing or planned for the future. We join our colleagues in extending thanks to the people and institutions of the Caribbean for their efforts to protect the past and for their incredible hospitality through the years.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Anthropology DepartmentMaxwell School, Syracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA
  2. 2.Africana Studies, University of Notre DameNotre DameUSA

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