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The Practice and Substance of Historical Archaeology in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Natalie Swanepoel
Chapter

James Kirkman (1957) first used the term “historical archaeology” pertaining to work in Africa to characterize his study of Islamic sites in East Africa, but we might regard much of the archaeology on the continent as historical even though it is not officially designated as such. This is in large part due to the interdisciplinary nature of African archaeology. The more traditional (Americanist) forms of historical archaeology are primarily found in two African subregions, namely western and southern Africa, perhaps because these two regions have histories that shared features with the North American experience and were of interest to Americanists.

Keywords

Historical Archaeology Oral Tradition Slave Trade African Society Documentary Source 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Anthropology and ArchaeologyUniversity of South AfricaPretoriaSouth Africa

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