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The Development of Post-Medieval Archaeology in Britain: A Historical Perspective

  • Geoff Egan
Chapter

The post-medieval period was long regarded in Britain as something of a Cinderella of the archaeological world. However, as we approach the end of the first decade of the new millennium, it has become as routine a part of most generalist field practitioners’ work as any other. The study of the archaeology of the latest period was previously regarded as optional, often being undertaken or not depending simply on the enthusiasm or lack of it on the part of the archaeologists in the particular area. The founding of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology (SPMA) in 1966 is an obvious watershed in the British national recognition of the subject.

Keywords

Material Culture Historical Archaeology Early Modern Period Archaeological World English Heritage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Thanks to David Barker, Paul Courtney, Dave Cranstone, David Gaimster, Audrey Horning, Margaret Robbins at Statistical Research, Inc., and many others for help on a variety of fronts during the preparation of this contribution.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Museum of London Specialist ServicesLondonUK

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