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Colonies, Colonialism, and Cultural Entanglement: The Archaeology of Postcolumbian Intercultural Relations

  • Kurt A. Jordan
Chapter

The current epoch of “globalization,” in which European-American political and economic forms are exported and used to dominate other areas of the world, is not a new phenomenon. Forcible expansion of an intercontinental system based on nation-states and nascent capitalism began in 1415, when Portugal seized the North African port of Ceuta (Wolf, 1982:129).

Keywords

Historical Archaeology Indigenous Group Colonial Control Subordinate Group Cultural Resource Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Some of the ideas in this chapter were presented at the 2006 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology in Sacramento, California. Adam Dewberry, Julie Jordan, Chris Matthews, Jon Parmenter, Beth Ryan, Audra Simpson, Barb Voss, and Mark Warner provided very helpful comments and suggestions on earlier versions of this essay. Cornell students Heather Briggs, Maureen Costura, Johanna Ullrich, and Rebecca Wall introduced me to some of the examples considered here.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Anthropology and American Indian ProgramCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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