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Industrial Archaeology

  • Patrick E. Martin
Chapter

The Industrial Revolution is arguably one of the most important social phenomena responsible for shaping the modern world. Of course, some historians and economists have long contended that this was or was not a “revolution” in the strictest sense of the word and scholars still debate whether the use of this metaphor is problematic. Most writers agree that this was not an event, but rather a process, with predictable precursors and variable rates of change from place to place. While earlier shifts in productive organization and technological sophistication set the stage for the rise of manufacturing and all of its associated social dimensions, the changes in scale and intensity of productivity, settlement patterns, distribution, exchange, and control that characterize industrialized societies have had a profound and lasting impact on the way we live today.

Keywords

Blast Furnace World Heritage Industrial Site Historical Archaeology National Park Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Social SciencesMichigan Technological UniversityHoughtonUSA

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