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Wholes, Halves, and Vacant Quarters: Ethnohistory and the Historical Method

  • Paul R. Picha
Chapter

At regular intervals since 1972, ethnohistory has been treated in the Annual Review of Anthropology (Carmack, 1972; Krech, 1991; Spores, 1980). It is particularly relevant for historical archaeology if one accepts Wood’s (1990:81) definition of ethnohistory as “the use of historical documents and historical method in anthropological research.” Ethnohistory is in many ways essential to historical archaeological practice, as it provides the methods for critically analyzing and synthesizing documentary sources used by historical archaeologists, whether complementary or contradictory to the archaeological findings. “Text-aided” archaeology (Little 1992) has many practitioners who research topics from many time periods.

Keywords

Great Plain Archaeological Record Historical Archaeology Northern Plain Historical Method 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Historic Preservation DivisionState Historical Society of North DakotaBismarckUSA

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