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World-Systems Theory, Networks, and Modern-World Archaeology

  • Charles E. OrserJr
Chapter

Archaeologists have been interested in research questions that by their nature spatially expand their investigations beyond the boundaries of a single site or even a small complex of related sites. Archaeologists with several topical specialties have investigated large topographical spaces, but an interest in extra-site space is particular pertinent to archaeologists examining the Postcolumbian world because of the global contacts that have occurred since about 1500 ce.

Keywords

Archaeological Site Network Theory Sixteenth Century World System Historical Archaeologist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research and CollectionsNew York State MuseumAlbanyUSA

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