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Beyond Consumption: Toward an Archaeology of Consumerism

  • Teresita Majewski
  • Michael Brian Schiffer
Chapter

In 1982, Kent V. Flannery ridiculed archaeologists—garbologists in particular—who had taken up the analysis of modern American artifacts. Despite Flannery’s denunciation, Rathje’s “Projet du Garbage” and other modern material culture studies have survived and prospered. As a genre of archaeology, however, modern material culture studies have low visibility because, we suggest, they lack a thematic focus.

Keywords

Material Culture Archaeological Record Historical Archaeology Antique Collector Artifact Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments for Reprinted Version

The authors would like to thank the many colleagues who commented on various drafts of this chapter, particularly Patrick McCray, who suggested several useful references. Martyn Tagg of Statistical Research, Inc. (SRI) and Steve Gregory (museum technician, Fort Huachuca Museum) graciously assisted TM in obtaining Fig. 1, and SRI Graphics Manager Margaret Robbins lent her graphics skills and those of her staff to preparing the illustrations for this chapter, some of which are new to this revision. Figure 3 appears courtesy of Mr. Vernon Hughes, of Clarksville, Missouri, and TM would like to gratefully acknowledge the insights he has shared with her over the years regarding Aesthetic-movement ceramics.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Statistical Research, Inc.TucsonUSA
  2. 2.University of ArizonaSchiffer Department of AnthropologyTucsonUSA

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