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A North American Perspective on Race and Class in Historical Archaeology

  • Jamie C. Brandon
Chapter

When Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast in August of 2005, it became one of the most costly and deadly storms in American history. It also, although briefly, highlighted the often muted importance of inequality in our society and started a discussion about race and class in the American mainstream media. An analysis of damage data shows that the storm’s impact was disproportionately borne by the region’s African American communities, by people who rented their homes, and by the poor and unemployed (Logan, 2006). “It takes a hurricane,” wrote senior editor and Newsweek columnist Jonathan Alter:

Keywords

Material Culture Racial Identity Historical Archaeologist Cultural Analysis Material Record 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Arkansas Archeological Survey & Southern Arkansas UniversityMagnoliaUSA

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