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Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Personality Disorders in Older Adults

  • Jennifer S. Cheavens
  • Thomas R. Lynch

Personality disorders, by DSM-IV (American Psychological Association, 1994) definition, are long-standing/stable, first evidenced in adolescence or early adulthood, and have associated pervasive difficulties in both interpersonal and impulsive functioning. Based on these criteria, it is difficult to adequately assess personality pathology in older adults for whom adolescence and early adulthood may have occurred decades ago. Additionally, several authors have argued that the diagnostic criterion for personality disorders (e.g., impulsivity in sexual and legal domains, aggression, work-related perfectionism) are more relevant for younger adults as opposed to their older adult counter-parts (Agronin & Maletta, 2000; van Alphen, Engelen, Kuin, & Derksen, 2006; Segal, Coolidge, & Rosowsky, 2000).

Keywords

Major Depressive Disorder Suicidal Ideation Personality Disorder Dialectical Behavior Therapy Older Adult 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer S. Cheavens
    • 1
  • Thomas R. Lynch
    • 1
  1. 1.Duke University and Duke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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