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Cell Technologies in Immunotherapy of Cancer

  • Vladimir Moiseyenko
  • Evgeny Imyanitov
  • Anna Danilova
  • Alexey Danilov
  • Irina Baldueva
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 601)

Abstract

Tumor growth is accompanied by active immune reactions even on the early stages. Vaccine therapy implies the use of single antigen or combination of antigens, either with or without adjuvants, for the modulation of immune response. N.N. Petrov Institute of Oncology joined the field of antitumor vaccine therapy and related cellular technologies in 1998. The following activities are held: (1) Optimization of the preparation of autologous and allogeneic antitumor vaccines and development of tumor cell culture bank for the experiments on allogeneic vaccination. (2) Clinical evaluation of autologous vaccine therapy by (a) bone marrow precursors of dendritic cells (DCs), which are loaded with tumor lysates; (b) genetically modified tumor cells; (c) intact tumor cells used in combination with various adjuvants (BCG, IL-1β , and IL-1β combined with low doses of cyclophosphamide) in patients with disseminated melanoma, metastatic kidney cancer, and colorectal cancer. Total 117 patients have received non-modified vaccine (48 patients: 2–6 intracutaneous BCG injections; 54 patients: 4–6 intracutaneous IL-1β injections; 15 patients: up to 6 injections of IL-1β in combination with low doses of cyclophosphamide). Clinical trial of genetically modified vaccine included 59 patients (clinical results: 1 PR (partial response) / 8 SD (disease stabilization) – melanoma, 2 PR/ 2 MR (minimal response) / 3 SD – renal cancer). Vaccine prepared from tumor cell-activated DC bone marrow precursors was administered to 18 patients (clinical results: 2 MR and 6 SD).

Keywords

Disease Stabilization Kidney Cancer Vaccine Administration Skin Melanoma Vaccine Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladimir Moiseyenko
    • 1
  • Evgeny Imyanitov
    • 2
  • Anna Danilova
    • 1
  • Alexey Danilov
    • 1
  • Irina Baldueva
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biotherapy and Bone Marrow TransplantationProf. N.N. Petrov Research Institute of OncologyRussia
  2. 2.Department of Molecular GeneticsProf. N.N. Petrov Research Institute of OncologyRussia

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