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Political Mobilization and Activism Among Latinos/as in the United States

  • Christian Zlolniski

It is a sunny Sunday on April 9, 2006 in Dallas when we arrive downtown to attend a massive rally in favor of immigrants’ rights. Organized by the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and many other Latino organizations, the march has attracted around 500,000 people, the largest march in the city’s history. The rally, like many others organized across the country, came at a moment of fierce political struggle in Washington and against a House proposal to further criminalize undocumented immigrants and people who assist them. The demonstrations represent the largest effort by immigrants in recent memory to influence public policy, and many immigrant advocates have described them as the beginning of a new, largely Hispanic civil rights movement. While we wait in front of the Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe, a major symbol for Mexicans and other Latinos, the crowd chants and waves U.S. flags in response to a call by LULAC and other organizations to display symbols of patriotism and avoid the use of Mexican flags that could antagonize their opponents. Under the heat of the sun, dozens of ice cream and other street vendors also wait for the march to start, carrying their own banners and selling their merchandise in the meantime. Security agents can be seen on top of the downtown skyscrapers watching the marchers, many of whom, following the recommendations of the organizers, wear white T-shirts to symbolize the peaceful tone of the rally.

Keywords

Political Participation Community Politics Undocumented Immigrant Mexican Immigrant Latina Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Zlolniski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyUniversity of Texas at ArlingtonArlingtonUSA

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