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New Latino Destinations

  • Manuel A. Vásquez
  • Chad E. Seales
  • Marie Friedmann Marquardt

On April 10, 2006, Latino immigrants and their allies took to the streets in more than 100 cities throughout the United States to advocate for comprehensive immigration reform. In Albertville, Alabama (population 20,000), more than 5,000 demonstrators marched, some carrying signs that read “Sweet Home Alabama.” In Jackson, Mississippi, approximately 500 participants joined together in singing a Spanish translation of “We Shall Overcome,” a song closely linked with the African American Civil Rights Movement (Hardin, 2006). Three Nebraska cities-South Sioux City, Lincoln, and Omaha-saw a combined 20,000 participants (Gonzalez & Stickney, 2006). Approximately 3,000 demonstrators gathered in Siler City, North Carolina (population 8,079) bearing signs that read, “We love Siler City” and “I pay taxes.” In Atlanta, Georgia, more than 50,000 protestors took to the streets, significantly surpassing the number of participants in such traditional immigrant gateway cities as San Diego, Los Angeles, and Miami (Skiba & Forester, 2006). As news reports documented rallies from Charleston, South Carolina to Indianapolis, Indiana; from Jackson, Mississippi to Garden City, Kansas, they highlighted the complex physical, cultural, and economic contours of a new map of Latino presence in the United States. Although the policy impact of this mobilization remains to be seen, one thing is perfectly clear: The cartographies of settlement for Latino and Latina immigrants have shifted in recent decades, and as Latinos filled the streets in protest, they mapped these shifts onto the landscapes of cities and towns throughout the United States.

Keywords

Latino Population Undocumented Immigrant Mexican Immigration Russell Sage Foundation Latino Immigrant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manuel A. Vásquez
    • 1
  • Chad E. Seales
    • 2
  • Marie Friedmann Marquardt
  1. 1.University of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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