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The Application of Sociology

  • John G. Bruhn
  • Howard M. Rebach

Keywords

Social Problem Child Poverty Juvenile Justice System Physical Punishment Social Arrangement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • John G. Bruhn
    • 1
  • Howard M. Rebach
    • 2
  1. 1.Northern Arizona UniversityFlagstaff
  2. 2.University of MarylandEastern Shore Princess Anne

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