Advertisement

Multivocality, Multifaceted Voices, and Korean Archaeology

  • Minkoo Kim

This chapter reflects on current discussions regarding multivocality with reference to archaeological narratives in Korean archaeology. The basis of this chapter stems from a recognition that the validity of multivocality has been commonly discussed in research traditions that were once (or are still) classified as colonialist or imperialist archaeology. In other words, the concept of multivocality is mostly introduced to and propagated in the regions where “Europeans remained politically and economically dominant for a considerable period of time” (Trigger 1984:360) and/or regions where general theories and evolutionary schemes developed in Anglo-American archaeology have been vigorously applied and tested. This implies that the debate on multivocality, despite its strong emphasis on globalization, transcontinental networks, and breakdowns of national boundaries, is still contained largely within a particular tradition of archaeological research. Many research traditions that were once categorized as nationalist archaeology by Trigger (1984) rarely appear in these discussions, and the implications of multivocality in these research settings have seldom been considered.

Keywords

Korean Peninsula Archaeological Research Nation Building Korean People South Korean Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Academy of Social Science. (1977). Chosun Gogohak Gaeyo [Introduction to Chosun Archaeology]. Pyongyang: Gwahak Baekgwasajeon Chulpansa [Science Encyclopedia Press] (In Korean).Google Scholar
  2. Academy of Social Science. (1991).Chosun Jeonsa [A History of Chosun]. Pyongyang: Gwahak Baekgwasajeon Chulpansa [Science Encyclopedia Press] (In Korean).Google Scholar
  3. Ahn, S. (1993). Origin and Differentiation of Domesticated Rice in Asia (Doctoral dissertation, Institute of Archaeology, University of London).Google Scholar
  4. Ahn, S. (1998). Dong asia seonsa-ui nonggyeong-gwa saengeop [Prehistoric Agriculture and Subsistence in East Asia]. Seoul: Hakyeon Munhwasa (In Korean).Google Scholar
  5. Anawak, J. (1996). Inuit perceptions of the past. In R.W. Preucel & I. Hodder (Eds.), Contemporary Archaeology in Theory: A Reader (pp. 646–651). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  6. Arimitsu, K. (1996). 1945–46 nyeon-e iteotdeon na-ui gyeongheomdam [Archaeology and museum in Korea between 1945–1946: a personal account]. Hanguk gogohakbo [Journal of Korean Archaeological Society], 34, 7–27 (In Korean).Google Scholar
  7. Barnes, G. L. (1993). China, Korea and Japan: the rise of civilization in East Asia. London: Thames and Hudson.Google Scholar
  8. Castells, M. (1996). The Rise of the Network Society. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.Google Scholar
  9. Castells, M. (2000). Toward a sociology of the network society. Contemporary Sociology, 29(5), 693–699.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Chang, K. (1986). The Archaeology of Ancient China. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Chungcheong Province. (2004). Bodojaryo: Chungbukdo jijeongmunhwajae simui gyeolgwa [News report summary: The selection of provincial cultural properties]: Munhwa yesulgwa, Munhwajae damdang [The Office of Culture and Arts, Department of Cultural Resource Management] (November 16, 2004) (In Korean).Google Scholar
  12. Condori, C. M. (1996). History and prehistory in Bolivia: what about the Indians? In R.W. Preucel & I. Hodder (Eds.), Contemporary Archaeology in Theory: A Reader (pp. 632–645). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  13. Crawford, G. W., & Shen, C. (1998). The origins of rice agriculture: recent progress in East Asia. Antiquity, 72, 858–866.Google Scholar
  14. Díaz-Andreu, M., & Champion, T. (1996). Nationalism and archaeology in Europe: an introduction. In M. Díaz-Andreu & T. Champion (Eds.), Nationalism and Archaeology in Europe (pp. 1–24). London: UCL Press.Google Scholar
  15. Discovery Channel. (2003). World’s ‘Oldest’ Rice Found in South Korea (October 22, 2003); http://dsc.discovery.com/news/afp/20031020/rice.html
  16. Do, Y. (1960) [1994]. Chosun wonsi gogohak [Prehistoric Archaeology of Chosun]. Pyongyang (Seoul): Gwahakwon chulpansa (reprinted by Balsan) (In Korean).Google Scholar
  17. Falkenhausen, L. V. (1995). The regionalist paradigm in Chinese archaeology. In P.L. Kohl & C.P. Fawcett (Eds.), Nationalism, Politics, and the Practice of Archaeology (pp. 198–217). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Featherstone, M. (1991). Consumer Culture and Postmodernism. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  19. Han, Y. H. (1996). The origin of Korean ethnicity. In Hanguk minjok-ui giwon-gwa hyeongseong [The origin of Korean ethnicity and its formation] (pp. 73–117). Seoul: Sohwa (In Korean).Google Scholar
  20. Han, C. G., & Son, G. E. (2000). Cheongwon sorori guseokgi yujeok (B jigu)-ui jicheung-gwa chulto yumul [The layers and artifacts of the Sorori Paleolithic site (Area B) in Cheongwon]. Silhak Sasang Yeongu, 14, 635–653 (In Korean).Google Scholar
  21. Heu, M. H., Lee, Y. J., & Woo, J. Y. (2002). Morphological observations of carbonized rice remains excavated from the Sorori Paleolithic site. First International Conference of Cheongwon County–Prehistoric Agriculture in Asia and Sorori Rice (pp. 31–39). Cheongju: Chungbuk National University Museum and Korea Land Corporation.Google Scholar
  22. Higham, C. (1995). The transition to rice cultivation in Southeast Asia. In T. D. Price & A. B. Gebauer (Eds.), Last Hunters, First Farmers: New Perspectives on the Prehistoric Transition to Agriculture (pp. 127–155). Santa Fe: School of American Research Press.Google Scholar
  23. Higham, C., & Lu, T. (1998). The origins and dispersal of rice cultivation. Antiquity, 72, 867–877.Google Scholar
  24. Hodder, I. (1997). ‘Always momentary, fluid and flexible’: towards a self-reflexive excavation methodology. Antiquity, 71(273), 691–700.Google Scholar
  25. Hodder, I. (1999). The Archaeological Process: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  26. Hodder, I. (Ed.). (2000). Towards Reflexive Method in Archaeology: The Example at Çatalhöyük. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research and British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara.Google Scholar
  27. Hodder, I. (2004). Archaeology Beyond Dialogue. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press.Google Scholar
  28. Im, H. (1996). New discoveries in the Korean Neolithic archaeology. In K. Omoto (Ed.), Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Origins of the Japanese (pp. 155–168). Tokyo: International Research Center for Japanese Studies.Google Scholar
  29. Jeong, S. I. (2005). Munmyeong gyoryu gihaeng (47) [Traveler’s journal of cultural interactions (47)]. Hankyoreh Sinmun (May 10, 2005), p. 16 (In Korean).Google Scholar
  30. Kim, W. Y. (1986). Hanguk gogohak gaeseol [Introduction to Korean Archaeology]. Seoul: Iljisa (In Korean).Google Scholar
  31. Kim, J. H. (2004). Segye choego byeopssi chulto-doen cheongwon sorori jumin choego ssal saengsan-wihae yeonguhoe baljok [People at Sorori, where the oldest rice was found, launched a research society]. (May 15, 2004); http://news.naver.com/news/read.php? mode=LSD &office_id=003&article_id=0000058441&section_id=102&menu_id=102
  32. Kim, S. H. (2004). Ssal-eun minjok-ui hon [Rice is ethnic sprit]. Segye Ilbo (June 7, 2004), p. 27 (In Korean).Google Scholar
  33. Kim. Y. E. (2004). Sorori byeopssi bakmulgwan 6wol-ui gwonjang site [The Sorori rice museum: the recommended site for June]. Kyunghyang Sinmun (June 24, 2004) (In Korean).Google Scholar
  34. Kim, H. M. (2005). ‘Cheongwon saengmyeong ssal’ Internet shopping mall gaejang [‘Cheongwon organic rice’ Internet shopping mall open]. Daejon Ilbo (April 26, 2005), p. 13 (In Korean).Google Scholar
  35. Kohl, P. L. (1998). Nationalism and archaeology: on the constructions of nations and the reconstructions of the remote past. Annual Review of Anthropology, 27, 223–246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Kwak, B. C. (2005). Sorori byeopssi [Sorori rice]. Hankyoreh Sinmun (December 9, 2005), p. 26 (In Korean).Google Scholar
  37. Lee. K. P. (2000). Segye choego byeopssi guknae balgul hwakin [The world’s oldest rice excavated in Korea]. Donga Ilbo (August 2, 2000) (In Korean).Google Scholar
  38. Lee, Y. J., & Woo, J. Y. (2000). Cheongwon sorori guseokgi yujeok [The Sorori Paleolithic Site in Cheongwon County]. Cheongju: Chungbuk National University Museum and Korea Land Corporation (In Korean).Google Scholar
  39. Lee, Y. J., & Woo, J. Y. (2002). Sorori byeopssi-ui balgul-gwa gwaje [The excavation of the Paleolithic Sorori rice and its important problems]. First International Conference of Cheongwon County–Prehistoric Agriculture in Asia and Sorori Rice (pp. 17–24). Cheongju: Chungbuk National University Museum and Korea Land Corporation (In Korean).Google Scholar
  40. Leone, M., Mullins, P., Creveling, M., Hurst, L., Jackson-Nash, B., Jones, L., Kaiser, H., Logan, G., & Warner, M. (1995). Can an African-American historical archaeology be an alternative voice? In I. Hodder, M. Shanks, A. Alexandri, V. Buchli, J. Carman, J. Last, & G. Lucas (Eds.), Interpreting Archaeology: Finding Meaning in the Past (pp. 110–124). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  41. Nelson, S. M. (1995). The politics of ethnicity in prehistoric Korea. In P. L. Kohl & C. P. Fawcett (Eds.), Nationalism, Politics, and the Practice of Archaeology (pp. 218–231). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  42. Pai, H. I. (1994). The politics of Korea’s past: the legacy of Japanese colonial archaeology in the Korean peninsula. East Asian History, 7, 25–48.Google Scholar
  43. Pai, H. I. (1998). The colonial origins of Korea’s collected past. In H. I. Pai & T. R. Tangherlini (Eds.), Nationalism and the Construction of Korean Identity (pp. 13–32). Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California.Google Scholar
  44. Pai, H. I. (2000). Constructing “Korean” Origins: A Critical Review of Archaeology, Historiography, and Racial Myth in Korean State-formation Theories. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  45. Palais, J. (1998). Nationalism: good or bad? In H. I. Pai & T. R. Tangherlini (Eds.), Nationalism and the Construction of Korean Identity (pp. 214–228). Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California.Google Scholar
  46. Roh, H. J. (1996). The Bronze Age. Hanguk minjok-ui giwon-gwa hyeongseong [The origin of Korean ethnicity and its formation] (pp. 119–183). Seoul: Sohwa (In Korean).Google Scholar
  47. Shin, H. (1998). 10 mannyeonjeon byeo balgul [Rice 100, 000 years old excavated]. Chosun Ilbo (March 17, 1998), p. 17 (In Korean).Google Scholar
  48. Smith, B. D. (1998). The Emergence of Agriculture. New York: Scientific American Library.Google Scholar
  49. Swidler, N. (Ed.). (1997). Native Americans and Archaeologists: Stepping Stones to Common Ground. Walnut Creek: AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
  50. Trigger, B. G. (1984). Alternative archaeologies: nationalist, colonialist, imperialist. Man, 19, 355–370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Trigger, B. G. (1989). A History of Archaeological Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  52. Trigger, B. G. (1995). Romanticism, nationalism, and archaeology. In P. L. Kohl and C. P. Fawcett (Eds.), Nationalism, Politics, and the Practice of Archaeology (pp. 263–279). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  53. U.N.S.D (United Nations Statistical Divisions). (2005). Internet users per 100 population (ITU estimates) [code 29969]. (March 10, 2005); http://unstats.un.org/unsd/cdb/cdb_series_xrxx.asp?series_code=29969
  54. U.S.D.S (United States Department of State). (2006). Democratic People’s Republic of Korea: Country Reports on Human Rights Practices–2005. (March 8, 2006). The Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor; http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61612.htm
  55. Vizenor, G. (1996). Bone courts: the rights and narrative representation of tribal bones. In R. W. Preucel & I. Hodder (Eds.), Contemporary Archaeology in Theory: A Reader (pp. 652–663). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  56. Whitehouse, D. (2003). World’s ‘oldest’ rice found. BBC News Online (October 21, 2003); http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3207552.stm
  57. Yi, S. (1992). Bukhan gogohaksa siron [A preliminary discussion on North Korean archaeology]. Dongbanghakji, 74, 1–74 (In Korean).Google Scholar
  58. Yi, S. (2001). Noebugo [On the thunder-axe]. Hanguk gogohakbo [Journal of Korean Archaeological Society], 44, 151–188 (In Korean).Google Scholar
  59. Yoo, T. J. (2004). Sorori byeopssi chultoji gukga munhwajae jijeong musan [Proposal to register the Sorori site as a national cultural property rejected]. Chosun Ilbo (November 3, 2004), p. Chungcheong A14 (In Korean).Google Scholar
  60. Zimmerman, L. J. (2001). Usurping Native American Voice. In T. L. Bray (Ed.) The Future of the Past: Archaeologists, Native Americans, and Repatriation, (pp. 169–184). New York: Garland Publishing.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Minkoo Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyChonnam National UniversityKorea

Personalised recommendations