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Irish Archaeology and the Recognition of Ethnic Difference in Viking Dublin

  • Patrick F. Wallace

Ireland, an island of rare natural beauty, has a rich, well-preserved archaeological heritage. The waterlogged conditions of the country’s peat bogs and some of its early towns, most notably Dublin, preserve the most delicate of organic remains (Waddell 1998). The historical nondestructive accidents of the prevalence of pastoral farming, and the relative absence of an industrial revolution, furthermore, have left Ireland with a unique surviving archaeological heritage that includes extensive stretches of prehistoric landscape and ancient estuarine remains.

Keywords

National Museum Archaeological Remains Eleventh Century Artifact Assemblage Royal Irish Academy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick F. Wallace
    • 1
  1. 1.National Museum of IrelandIreland

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